Jail for woman who abused her baby

A WOMAN who physically abused her toddler son in Bundaberg and Brisbane because she wanted attention has been jailed for five years.

The 34-year-old, who cannot be named, pleaded guilty in the Brisbane District Court last week to one count of causing grievous bodily harm and six of assault occasioning bodily harm.

The mother inflicted traumatising pain on the boy through anal digital penetration in 2005 and 2006, when he was between six and 20 months old.

When the boy was taken to hospital for treatment, she continued to abuse him even as she denied causing the injuries.

The attacks on the boy occurred over 14 months.

After her arrest, the woman told psychiatrists and police that she had harmed her son because voices in her head told her to do it.

However, the court was told she later admitted she was not coping with three children at home, and that she harmed him because she wanted attention.

In a letter she wrote to the court last week, the woman said she knew what she was doing was wrong, and accepted she should have stopped.

The court was told the boy now suffers faecal incontinence as a result of his injuries, which may be permanent.

In sentencing the woman on Tuesday, Judge Terry Martin rejected submissions she had been acting under psychosis when she abused her child.

He described her behaviour as “too horrible to contemplate”, telling the woman she had clearly put her own interests ahead of the child’s.

Judge Martin sentenced the woman to five years’ jail, and ordered she be eligible for parole in November 2011.



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