Spinnaker Restaurant head chef Chris Kane and Lee Sutcliffe like that MasterChef has opened people’s minds to food.
Spinnaker Restaurant head chef Chris Kane and Lee Sutcliffe like that MasterChef has opened people’s minds to food. Scottie Simmonds

Why Bundy loves MasterChef

MASTERCHEF contestants might be heating up television ratings, but would they cut the mustard in Bundaberg restaurants?

Spinnakers chef Chris Kane said the show had changed the way people viewed food.

“Diners are so much better educated and more aware of food now, so you have to be really creative,” Mr Kane said.

“When the show publicises certain lines of product, it means the wholesalers take on more of those special or unusual products so there is greater variety.”

The kitchen veteran of 27 years said the competitors had proved they were on the boil.

“I’d definitely hire them — they tick all the boxes in terms of motivation, enthusaism and high standards of food preparation,” he said.

But Pappardelles restauranteur Ralph Reali said he wasn’t convinced the TV stars would be up to the chop.

“It’s great entertainment, but at the end of the day, it’s highly unlikely they would become master chefs after a couple of weeks on television,” Mr Reali said.

“It takes years of experience and apprenticeships with different types of kitchens and foods to become a real master chef.”

He said the contestants wouldn’t understand the pressure-cooker nature of a restaurant kitchen.

“They’d need a lot more real experience and training,” he said.

“But it is good to see them cooking quality food instead of junk,” he said.



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