Stack of colorful books, grungy blue background, free copy space Vintage old hardback books on wooden shelf on the deck table, no labels, blank spine. Back to school. Education background
Stack of colorful books, grungy blue background, free copy space Vintage old hardback books on wooden shelf on the deck table, no labels, blank spine. Back to school. Education background Vimvertigo

We're more likely to seek help with reading and writing: stats

REGIONAL Queenslanders are more likely to seek help with reading and writing than people in the southern states with 86 people in the Bundaberg region doing so in the last 12 months.

A quarter of calls to the Reading Writing Hotline in the past year were from Queensland, with about half of those from regional or remote areas of the state.

"While Queensland makes up about a fifth of the national population, a quarter of calls for help with reading and writing came from Queenslanders,” Reading Writing Hotline manager Vanessa Iles said.

"It's excellent that Queenslanders are reaching out for help - it's a brave decision that I have seen change many people's lives for the better.

"We've had calls from a range of people across the state, for example a young man running a small business in Central Queensland and a Mackay mother who wanted to improve her literacy skills to help her kids with homework.

"We also had a call from a Northern Queensland employer who wanted to help one of his best salespeople with emails and a call from a woman in Brisbane who wanted to fill in the gaps that she missed when she finished school at 15.

CALLS FOR HELP: A map showing the number of calls made to the Reading Writing Hotline in the last year across Queensland.
CALLS FOR HELP: A map showing the number of calls made to the Reading Writing Hotline in the last year across Queensland.

"Per capita, we've had more calls from Queensland than from New South Wales or Victoria, however the highest number of calls per capita were from the Northern Territory.

"This does not necessarily mean that there are lower levels of literacy in Queensland than in other states but it does show that more Queenslanders are reaching out for help per capita than in other states.

"It's amazing the strategies people can invent to cope or hide the gaps they may have in literacy and it's equally amazing how much of a difference it can make when they do overcome their fear and seek help.”

The national hotline provides free support for about 3000 people a year across Australia.

Recently it marked its 150,000th caller.

The biggest group of callers to the Hotline are men aged between 25 and 44, from an English speaking background who finished school before Year 9.

"The hotline has 10 fully trained and experienced teachers who are qualified in teaching adult literacy to give advice, find the right material for people or find them local services that can give people the help they need,” Ms Iles said.



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