A DUST storm could affect parts of southern Queensland today, according to online weather forecasters.

Reports of "raised/potential dust storms" across south-west Queensland have appeared on social media, claiming gusty winds could whip up dust storms later on Thursday and into tomorrow.

Forecasters say the storms would be caused by a trough sweeping through western Queensland, with the potential for reaching the east coast on Friday.

The Bureau of Meteorology quashed these claims, however, saying it was very unlikely for the east coast to be hit by a dust storm.

THE GREAT BRISBANE DUST STORM

The last time the southeast corner, and Brisbane, was hit with a serious dust storm was in 2009.

Victoria Bridge in Brisbane during the Eastern Australian dust storm.
Victoria Bridge in Brisbane during the Eastern Australian dust storm.

The storm, known as the Eastern Australian dust storm, swept through parts of Queensland and NSW between 22-24 September.

The dust plume measured 500km in width and 1000km in length and was visible from space.

The view of the Brisbane CBD from under the Story Bridge at Kangaroo Point, taken at 11.50am on September 23, 2009.
The view of the Brisbane CBD from under the Story Bridge at Kangaroo Point, taken at 11.50am on September 23, 2009.

 

WHAT TO DO IN A DUST STORM?

While dust storms generally pose no serious health threat to those in good health, people with asthma and emphysema may experience difficulties.

Dust storms can cause irritation to the eyes and upper airways and may trigger allergic reactions and asthma attacks and could cause serious breathing-related problems.

Besides those with respiratory conditions, people most at risk at having adverse reactions include infants, children and adolescents, the elderly, people with heart disease and those with diabetes.

If there is a dust storm, and you are a person at risk it is best to stay indoors with the windows and doors closed and to avoid vigorous exercise during the storm.

WHY IS BRISBANE ALREADY HAZY?

Meanwhile, Brisbane is already experiencing a hazy start to Thursday due to hazard reduction burns being carried out by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service at Freshwater National Park and North Stradbroke Island.

The fires were lit Wednesday evening to burn up fuel left on the ground and help with forest regeneration.

The QPWS was joined on North Stradbroke by the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation on planned burns, around protected estates, to ensure preservation of cultural values.

Motorists and mariners around Sibelco mining roads, Blakesley and Price anchorages, Big Canalpin Creek, Lamb and Macleay Islands and the bottom end of Moreton Bay may experience impaired visibility caused by the smoke and asthmatics in these areas are advised to keep their medication at hand.

If the weather is good, the burn at Freshwater National Park will blaze until Friday, July 20.

A full list of hazard reduction burns around the state is available via QFES.



Lightning strike shocks man recharging mobile phone

premium_icon Lightning strike shocks man recharging mobile phone

Storm warning not just an old wives' tale

Breeze Cafe opens its doors again

premium_icon Breeze Cafe opens its doors again

The popular Friday night pizzas are back

Woman flown to hospital after standing on prawn

Woman flown to hospital after standing on prawn

Camper in her 30s suffers allergic reaction

Local Partners