Bargara police officers Darren Green and Tharyn Daly with Andrea Poulson, who got the surprise of her life when she went in for a swim at Kelly's Beach Bargara and encountered the body of a tiger shark.
Bargara police officers Darren Green and Tharyn Daly with Andrea Poulson, who got the surprise of her life when she went in for a swim at Kelly's Beach Bargara and encountered the body of a tiger shark. Ron Burgin

Shark body found at Bargara

THE sight of a shark fin in Kelly's Beach waters on Saturday morning ended up not quite as frightening as beach-goers expected.

“I was sitting up having a piece of fish and saw a fin in the water - as I got closer I saw it was a shark,” former skipper and beach-goer Andrea Poulson said.

Read more about sharks at Bargara

The 3.4m female tiger shark was dead, a victim of a drumline bait, and had come loose and drifted towards the shore.

Miss Poulson, who has enjoyed swimming at Bargara since she was a child, said she was not worried and did not want to see people alarmed.

“A couple of young blokes were standing around, so I grabbed them and said when the wave comes, I'll grab the tail, you grab the fin,” Miss Poulson said.

“He had a big shark hook in its mouth.

“So I brought the ute down, tied it round the tail, and tried to contact the shark guy.

“It's not new to me, I was a skipper.”

Miss Poulson was humble about her actions, and said she wanted to assure people.

“I just tried to do what we do in the community,” she said.

“People have always swum at Bargara, and I always will.”

Queensland Government Shark Control Program contractor Mark Cawthray said the carcass was disposed of by council.

“She's got herself off one of the drumlines,” he said.

“They don't usually don't wash in - it was hooked on drumline and got washed off with the weather.”

Mr Cawthray said the local waters have recently been “very quiet” with shark activity.

A 4m tiger shark caused concern earlier this year when it was caught on a drumline at Kelly's Beach.

The shark was among 53 predators caught on drumlines placed offshore from Bargara, Kelly's Beach, Nielson Park and Oaks Beach last year.

What would you do?

Although the well-known tune from Jaws may come to mind at the mention of a shark, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) say it is all a matter of being sensible if you want to avoid the notorious animals.

“Sharks live in the sea and estuaries in Queensland, but shark attacks are rare,” an EPA spokesman said.

“Get local advice before you swim and never swim at dawn, dusk or night-time (since this is prime feeding time for sharks).”

Swimmers should never swim at unpatrolled beaches, near bait fish, or in river mouths or estuaries, or murky water.



THE ICE DEBATE: Rehab or no rehab?

premium_icon THE ICE DEBATE: Rehab or no rehab?

Bridges program leader says a rehab facility isn't the solution

UPDATE: Lane reopen after head-on crash

UPDATE: Lane reopen after head-on crash

Police spokeswoman confirms Miller St is open after head-on crash

Spike in Bundy dog owners not registering pets

premium_icon Spike in Bundy dog owners not registering pets

More than 4000 reminder notices issued

Local Partners