TOBRUK TOURS: First look on board the ex-HMAS Tobruk
TOBRUK TOURS: First look on board the ex-HMAS Tobruk Contributed

WATCH: Video tour of inside ex-HMAS Tobruk

A ONCE in a lifetime event is taking place at the port for community members who were lucky enough to tour ex-HMAS Tobruk.

The former navy ship will see about 1800 locals take in the guided walk along its decks in the coming days.

The vessel is set to be scuttled off the shore between Bundaberg and Hervey Bay by June next year and is set to boost tourism as a diving hot spot.

The NewsMail was fortunate enough to take a guided tour and snap some photos to share with those who missed out on the free tour tickets.

The tour starts as you walk on to the vacant deck and the mind drifts thinking about what it would have been like when in action.

Queensland Parks and Wildlife Services' Daniel Clifton explains the ins and outs of the vessel - including what it will be like once it is sunk.

TOBRUK TOURS: First look on board the ex-HMAS Tobruk
TOBRUK TOURS: First look on board the ex-HMAS Tobruk Contributed

Mr Clifton said at any one time the ship would have about 150 naval personnel on board and its main use was transporting army troops, up to 500 at a time.

"If it was on deployment to Singapore or wherever you would have all the army, your crew, their crew and all their equipment on board,” he said.

"A personal carry, the army boats, helicopters and much more.”

The size of the ship becomes apparent as you walk across the helicopter landing pad and the guides inform you about each aspect of it and what it was used for.

"The bow opens up and when its at the bottom of the ocean you will be able to swim right through it,” he said.

"Downstairs is a big open storage area, which is going to make it amazing for diving.”

Mr Clifton said there was still a bit of work to be done to make the ship ready for a dive site.

TOBRUK TOURS: First look on board the ex-HMAS Tobruk
TOBRUK TOURS: First look on board the ex-HMAS Tobruk Contributed

"It's really interesting, people keep saying to me 'how long it take to sink a ship?',” he said.

"There's lot of heavy fuels and oil, that all needs to come out beforehand.”

"The ship is 127m long and 37m high and when we sink it out in the bay there will be about 27m of water.”

The top of the ship will be taken off and at low tide will sit about 5m below the surface which will make a great opportunity not only for divers, but for the less experienced snorkeller as well.

The lower levels of ex-HMAS Tobruk was not on show for the community, but if you were lucky enough to pick up one of the free tickets before they were snapped up, you won't be disappointed.



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