ON THE JOB: Samantha Brady, Kaylee Fisher and Tracey Liddelow performing a CPR simulation.
ON THE JOB: Samantha Brady, Kaylee Fisher and Tracey Liddelow performing a CPR simulation.

Ward is their oyster for new Wide Bay nurses

FOR 52 new nurses the wards are at their feet.

The Wide Bay Hospital and Health Service facilities have welcomed their initial 2020 graduate intake at the Bundaberg, rural and Fraser Coast facilities.

Kaylee Fisher and Samantha Brady were two of the 29 Bundaberg and rural-based graduates to joined their ward teams after finishing their respective orientation programs and they were excited to have an opportunity to help people.

“My family’s always been in healthcare and I was in a pretty bad accident myself; and so I got to see what it was like on the other side of the patient experience,” Ms Fisher said.

“I saw both positives and negatives from the care I received, so from that I’ve always had an interest in challenging myself and I think nursing, the career itself, pushes you out of your comfort zone.”

Working in what is a continual learning environment, Ms Fisher said the career progression opportunities were likewise ongoing in the nursing field.

“You don’t have to stick to an RN level … for myself I’m doing a masters postgraduate program through CQU and that’s definitely something that drew me towards the career,” she said.

“I’m currently in general medical; however, I really have an interest in emergency, critical care. So that’s predominantly where I want to be.”

ON THE JOB: Meghan Krogh, Kaylee Fisher, Belinda Lee Bull, Samantha Brady and Tracey Liddelow.
ON THE JOB: Meghan Krogh, Kaylee Fisher, Belinda Lee Bull, Samantha Brady and Tracey Liddelow.

For Ms Brady it was her interest in human anatomy and the chance to work and help people that led her down the nursing path.

“You’re in a spot where you see people when they are at their most vulnerable, and it’s nice to be able to make a little bit of a difference in their day helping them get better,” she said.

Ms Fisher said now that they have scrubbed up and are on the wards the responsibilities have undoubtedly changed; but they were eager to help make a difference.

“Whether it’s a mental health patient and that is just a conversation they need to have, because they don’t have anyone else; or if it’s a patient that’s had a chronic condition and they’ve had bad experiences in the past, we have the opportunity every single day in what we do to make that difference.”

Acting CEO Debbie Carroll said as someone who came from a nursing background, it was particularly exciting to see the next generation of our profession join the Wide Bay team and “I know they will have every opportunity to enjoy fruitful careers”.

WBHHS Executive Director of Nursing and Midwifery Fiona Sewell said the new graduates came from a range of tertiary institutions, including from local universities, adding a broad range of perspectives, experiences and knowledge to the existing team.

“In nursing, we talk about the 6Cs – our six core values of Care, Compassion, Competence, Communication, Courage and Commitment.

“We believe our current staff embody those values in every aspect of what they do, and I’m looking forward to seeing our new nurses embed those values in their practice and progress in their careers in the years to come.

“I know that among them there are future leaders of the Wide Bay nursing and midwifery team.”

WBHHS is also planning a mid-year intake of nursing graduates.



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