US man’s ‘offensive’ fairy bread post

 

 

When you caption a video "Don't get mad at me Aussies", chances are, they're going to get mad.

I am sure you have heard of the saying - if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

But to the shock of both Aussies and Kiwis, an American man has done just that, after he tampered with a favourite childhood recipe.

Beau Coffron, known as the @lunchboxdad on TikTok, shared a "tutorial" on how to make

fairy bread and let's just say his version was met with patriotic rage.

Instead of using the traditional spread of butter, Beau lathered a slice of white bread in peanut butter.

All it took was one harmless video on how to make fairy bread for US TikTok user Beau Coffron aka @lunchboxdad to offend Aussies and Kiwis. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad
All it took was one harmless video on how to make fairy bread for US TikTok user Beau Coffron aka @lunchboxdad to offend Aussies and Kiwis. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad


"These originally became popular around New Zealand and Australia," he begins the video.

"They use butter, I like peanut butter, so spread that peanut butter on."

He then dumps (any) sprinkles on top before using a cookie cutter to form love heart and star shapes.

The popular TikTok user included the caption "Don't get mad at me Aussies" - but, of course, that's exactly what happened.

 

Instead of using butter, the American dad lathers a slice of white bread in … peanut butter. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad
Instead of using butter, the American dad lathers a slice of white bread in … peanut butter. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad

 

He then drops chunky sprinkles on top. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad
He then drops chunky sprinkles on top. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad

 

It doesn’t end there – he doesn’t cut it up in triangles. Instead, he uses a cookie cutter to form love heart and star shaped cut-outs in another change to the original – a sandwich lid. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad
It doesn’t end there – he doesn’t cut it up in triangles. Instead, he uses a cookie cutter to form love heart and star shaped cut-outs in another change to the original – a sandwich lid. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad

"This is offensive to all Australians," one of the more than 134,000 viewers of the clip wrote.

"Bro what, is this a joke?" another person asked.

"If your (sic) not Australian you do not have permission to make fairy bread especially if your (sic) gonna stuff it up like this," a third added, while a fourth person wondered, "Why is America like this?"

Most of the comments included the words "crime", "fail" and "destroyed" to describe his … unique take on the cult classic.

 

 

 

 

After copping a heap of backlash, he got his two sons to do a taste test. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad
After copping a heap of backlash, he got his two sons to do a taste test. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad


But while his use of peanut butter drew plenty of attention, furious viewers also couldn't help but notice his choice of sprinkles.

"One, never and I mean never use peanut butter, two, the circle sprinkles not the long sprinkles; they go soggy and three, they're single slices," one woman pointed out.

"Fairy bread has hundreds and thousands, NOT sprinkles. Huge difference. This is a peanut butter and sprinkle sandwich. NOT fairy bread!" a second added.

"This guy has made himself hated by Aussies and Kiwis," wrote another user.

 

Unsurprisingly, his sons chose the butter and hundreds and thousands version and he admitted to defeat. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad
Unsurprisingly, his sons chose the butter and hundreds and thousands version and he admitted to defeat. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad

After copping a heap of backlash, the dad created another video, "for the sandwich haters who said I did it wrong".

But this time he asked his sons to take part in a taste test between the two versions.

Sure enough the brothers agreed with the rest of Australia and New Zealand - the original version tastes better.

"Looks like I was wrong and you guys were right."

On ya Beau for admitting defeat.

So, how do you actually make fairy bread?

 

How to make fairy bread. Picture: iStock
How to make fairy bread. Picture: iStock

 

 

If you go by a report in the Hobart Mercury newspaper dating back to 1929, it explains a children's party at the time included a serving of bread, butter, and hundreds and thousands.

In other words, it's nothing more than triangles (not fancy shapes) of white bread covered with butter and topped with small, colourful sprinkles.

Do you agree? Tell us in our poll.

 

 

Originally published as US man's 'offensive' fairy bread post

They tried their dad’s version and the original way it’s made. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad
They tried their dad’s version and the original way it’s made. Picture: TikTok/Lunchboxdad


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