IT IS full steam ahead for recycling in Bundaberg.

Councils across Australia have been thrown into turmoil following China's decision to limit the foreign recycling products it accepts, prompting Ipswich City Council's to axe its recycling scheme rather than pass on additional recycling costs to ratepayers.

In response, Bundaberg Regional Council today assured residents the contents of their yellow-topped bins would continue to be recycled.

And even though Ipswich, after public outcry, flipped their decision and announced their scheme would continue through increasing household rates, Bundaberg waste and recycling spokesman Scott Rowleson said recycling "certainly (wouldn't) stop here".

 

He also said Queensland Government's introduction of a waste levy would not increase Bundy residents' rates.

It's not a rate increase area, it will be a 'user pays' system. So if you use our landfill facilities ... then it's possible a waste levy will be passed on," Cr Rowleson said.

"But the State Government hasn't given us any (further) indication yet."

RECYCLING: Bundaberg Regional Council waste and recycling spokesman Scott Rowleson and Impact Community Services chief executive Tanya O'Shea.
RECYCLING: Bundaberg Regional Council waste and recycling spokesman Scott Rowleson and Impact Community Services chief executive Tanya O'Shea. Sarah Steger

Cr Rowleson said once more information was available to the council, they would "work closely with the (State Government) to get the modelling right".

According to Impact Community Services chief executive Tanya O'Shea, there were significant differences between Bundaberg's recycling scheme model and Ipswich's.

"The council collect what's in your yellow-topped bins, they bring it to our facility and our 27 workers with a disability pick through the product, we sort it and then we sell that product, and that's what keeps our business viable," she said.

RECYCLING: Bundaberg Regional Council waste and recycling spokesman Scott Rowleson and Impact Community Services chief executive Tanya O'Shea.
RECYCLING: Bundaberg Regional Council waste and recycling spokesman Scott Rowleson and Impact Community Services chief executive Tanya O'Shea. Sarah Steger

Impact is in the midst of negotiations to find a solution to selling certain products like paper and low-grade plastic, which have recently become increasingly difficult to sell.

"It's really important (governments) have this on (their) agenda," Ms O'Shea said.



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