Michael and Kyly Clarke asked for privacy. But when making your name from being in the public eye, interest comes with the territory, writes Kim Wilson.
Michael and Kyly Clarke asked for privacy. But when making your name from being in the public eye, interest comes with the territory, writes Kim Wilson.

Uncomfortable truth behind Kyly and Michael Clarke’s split

Michael Clarke and Kyly Boldy's divorce is the latest in a long line of celebrity breakups that have captured the public's attention.

Their seemingly picture perfect life has been followed by almost a million fans on their social media accounts and countless others in the mainstream media, so it's no surprise people are interested in their sensational split.

Remarkably, news of their break up has only surfaced in recent days, though they confirm they officially separated five months ago.

"After living apart for some time, we have made the difficult decision to ­separate as a couple, amicably," a statement from the couple read.

"With the greatest of respect for each other, we've come to the ­mutual conclusion that this is the best course for us to take while committed to the co-parenting of our daughter."

Kyly and Michael Clarke have asked for privacy since announcing their split. Picture: kylyclarke/Instagram
Kyly and Michael Clarke have asked for privacy since announcing their split. Picture: kylyclarke/Instagram

The fact they've been able to keep it under wraps for so long has given them a head start many of the other celeb couples haven't had in being able to privately work out their separate living situations, custody arrangements and financial settlements.

And the Clarke's financial split will be substantial, estimated at around $40 million, which includes a $12 million Vaucluse home and $8 million Bondi apartment.

To date, they have also avoided sordid stories of secret affairs and blame games, which is a blessing for their four-year-old daughter Kelsey Lee.

Breakups happen, they're a fact of life. But the pain and sadness, and in some cases the humiliation, is compounded when the couple is in the public eye.

AFL glamour couple Nadia and Jimmy Bartel's break-up, as well as NRL pair Phoebe and Sam Burgess's split, are prime examples where tawdry details have been aired in public in the most devastating way for the parties involved.

Phoebe and Sam Burgess also endured a highly publicised separation. Picture: Instagram
Phoebe and Sam Burgess also endured a highly publicised separation. Picture: Instagram

At times like these, we need to be sensitive and not sensationalise an already awful situation.

Both Michael and Kyly have requested privacy after releasing the statement confirming their split, and I think we need to respect that.

Having said that, if they choose to put themselves out in the spotlight again they have to accept that questions may arise as to how they're recovering and resettling following the divorce.

They should not be malicious or aggressive inquiries, but people have a genuine affection for the couple and legitimately would like to know how they are going.

The Clarkes, like other celebrity families, have become popular and benefited from publicly sharing aspects of their personal lives and unfortunately though mostly good, sometimes it can have a negative impact as well.

Hopefully that is short lived for them both and that like many others who suffer through a divorce, they will rebuild happy and fulfilling lives with their children as unaffected as possible from it.

Their commitment to co-parenting and the images we have seen on social media of each of them separately with Kelsey Lee since the split indicate that is their intention.

Kim Wilson is The Herald Sun's Executive Fashion & Lifestyle Editor.



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