Ava Moran, Alana Reid, teacher Kerry Haynes and Amber Miller (front), Lily Taylor, Jethro Suosaari, Hudson Howard, Ella Howard, Iris de Jager and Josie Gordon (back).
Ava Moran, Alana Reid, teacher Kerry Haynes and Amber Miller (front), Lily Taylor, Jethro Suosaari, Hudson Howard, Ella Howard, Iris de Jager and Josie Gordon (back). Mike Knott BUN251018TEA1

Time to recognise mentors of the community - teachers

AS AN adult you realise the difference a good teacher can make, but as a parent you get to see it first-hand.

Teachers spend more waking hours with children during the week than their own parents.

During this time they not only teach maths and English, but mentor and help guide them in the right direction.

A positive influence from a teacher can be a turning point in a youngsters life.

As a parent, I have found this especially true this year.

My daughter, Alana Reid, went into Year 4 a little lost, not knowing her place among her peers and not coping with the work given to her.

She never complained and as a parent, I was oblivious.

WORLD TEACHERS' DAY: Sophie Duxbury, teacher Kerry Haynes, Bridget Mason, Alana Reid and Maya Gough.
WORLD TEACHERS' DAY: Sophie Duxbury, teacher Kerry Haynes, Bridget Mason, Alana Reid and Maya Gough. Mike Knott BUN251018TEA6

It was her Woongarra State School teacher, Kerry Haynes, who stood up and made a difference.

Mrs Haynes has been teaching for 40 years and is set to retire in just seven weeks' time.

She said in this time kids hadn't changed much, and the bonds formed during the decades of teaching would last a lifetime.

"It's a good time for me to retire - I am retiring on a high note,” Mrs Haynes said.

"This is my happy place, I always wanted to be a teacher and it was so rewarding.”

It was clear listening to Mrs Haynes share her story that her passion was to help children became strong adults.

"Some of the children I am teaching this year, I taught their parents,” she said.

"And some of the children I have taught over the time would now be about 46 years old - that shows how long I've been doing it.”

Mrs Haynes said since she was a young girl she had always wanted to be a teacher.

"Teaching is a lot more stressful and there's a lot more work compared to what there use to be,” she said.

"But the kids remain the same - it's just important to make sure the kids enjoy school and want to keep coming day after day.”

With emotional words, Mrs Haynes said a career in education was job shared through the community, and encouraged people to take on the role of not just a teacher, but a mentor.

This World Teachers' Day is a chance to recognise all the amazing teachers, just like Mrs Haynes, around the region.



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