Queensland Ambulance Acting Officer in Charge for Bundaberg Sean Quarmby, Bundaberg Police Senior Constable Timothy Clark and Area commander for QFES Bundaberg John Pappas take the Fatality Free Friday pledge and urge others to do the same.
Queensland Ambulance Acting Officer in Charge for Bundaberg Sean Quarmby, Bundaberg Police Senior Constable Timothy Clark and Area commander for QFES Bundaberg John Pappas take the Fatality Free Friday pledge and urge others to do the same.

The impact fatalities have on emergency workers

EMERGENCY services have shared their harrowing experiences responding to fatalities with the hope that people will think before they drive this Fatality Free Friday.

Police, ambulance and fireys are urging drivers to take the pledge and remember the effects of the fatal five.

Senior Constable Timothy Clark has been a forensic crash investigator for six years and said he still experienced a sick feeling in his stomach every time he was going to a potential fatal.

“I have attended multiple jobs in the Bundaberg area and every time I drive past a road where I have conducted a forensic crash investigation I always get a flashback,” Snr Const Clark said.

“I remember what the scene looked like, what the person looked like, and what the cars looked like and that’ll always stick with me and that will always haunt me every time I drive past.”

Snr Const Clark said they were trying to get the message across that one stupid mistake could cost a life.

“I can honestly say the worst part of the job is going up to somebody’s house, knocking on the door and telling them that their loved one or family member is no longer here,” he said.

“That is something that no police or emergency officer wants to do in their career but unfortunately it is something that we have to do.”

Senior Constable Timothy Clark reading the pledges motorists have made for Fatality Free Friday.
Senior Constable Timothy Clark reading the pledges motorists have made for Fatality Free Friday.

Queensland Ambulance Acting Officer in Charge for Bundaberg Sean Quarmby said it was a horrible feeling attempting to save someone’s life and being unsuccessful.

“I have had a few scenes that have been quite confronting and others in rural or remote areas where I am the first on scene for quite sometime before back up arrives and it does remain with you for a long time,” Mr Quarmby said.

“Fatality Free Friday is one day but we want all road users to take the pledge to ensure that everyone gets to their destination safely whenever they are driving.”

Area commander for QFES Bundaberg John Pappas said he could still vividly remember the first fatal he attended and every one since.

“It is quite stressful for the crews but the training does kick in,” Mr Pappas said.

“They are well trained and well-rehearsed in undertaking these rescues but at the same time they are people and they understand its someone’s family and it does impact crews.

“Sometimes you turn up and you think how could this have occurred, it’s a straight stretch of road and if people weren’t speeding, if they weren’t fatigued, if they weren’t distracted this wouldn’t have occurred.”

Before hopping in the car this weekend, Mr Pappas urged motorists to slow down and think about how their actions could impact the lives of others.

Click here to take the pledge.



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