TRAGIC DEATH: Sea Shepherd footage shows the trapped tiger shark hanging upside down from the drumline, with rope wrapped tightly around her tail, and a metal chain and hook in her jaw.
TRAGIC DEATH: Sea Shepherd footage shows the trapped tiger shark hanging upside down from the drumline, with rope wrapped tightly around her tail, and a metal chain and hook in her jaw. 7 News Wide Bay

Terribly cruel death for shark caught in lines off Bargara

A 3M-LONG tiger shark has been caught in a drumline off the coast off Kellys Beach and euthanised by the State Government.

The shark was spotted on Tuesday by Jonathan Clark, the Queensland co-ordinator for the Apex Harmony Campaign being run by Sea Shepherd Global.

Mr Clark and his team were in the process of documenting all the net and drumlines of the Queensland Shark Control Program when they spotted the female shark.

Footage they captured showed the trapped tiger shark hanging upside down from the drumline, with rope wrapped tightly around her tail, and a metal chain and hook in her jaw.

Mr Clark, speaking to 7 News, said it was a tragedy to lose the life of another shark trapped in a drumline.

"It's horrible to watch ... it is animal cruelty in action on our beaches,” Mr Clark told 7 News.

Mr Clark said Sea Shepherd could not legally interfere with the drumline to release the shark AND he would like to see the State Government use non-lethal practices to remove caught sharks.

"Our protocol is when we find the animals alive on the drumline is to call the Shark Control Program manager,” he said.

"My view is, knowing the fate of the animal that is a target species, the minimum they could do is to come out immediately and humanely euthanise them.”

"(Sea Shepherd) aren't advocates for any type of euthanaisa in this system - but they should be able to do it as humanely as possible.

"There is no silver bullet when it comes to shark bite mitigation. However, there are a range of effective non-lethal shark mitigation strategies that can be assessed for each individual location. The government should be doing this with some fervour.

"These new technologies prove the current lethal measures obsolete. Current lethal methods are completely in-effective at saving human lives.”

The NewsMail sought comment from the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.

A department spokesperson said the state government would not "compromise human safety and continues to support the Shark Control Program with its combination of shark nets and drum lines at 85 of Queensland's most popular beaches.”

"Drumlines are effective at catching species such as tiger sharks, which are more prevalent in north Queensland, whereas shark nets are a more effective measure for species such as the aggressive bull shark, which are more prevalent in south east Queensland,” the spokesperson said.

"Non-dangerous sharks and other non-target species caught in shark control equipment are released alive where possible.”

The spokesperson said using drumlines and bait that doesn't attract dolphins and turtles were some of the measures used by the Shark Control Program to reduce the capture of non-target species.

"Improvements in the types of nets, hooks and bait have improved the ability to target key species, while reducing non-target catch,” they said.

"In 2017, the Queensland Government established a Scientific Working Group to provide scientific advice to improve the Shark Control Program's effectiveness and reduce impacts on by-catch. The Scientific Working Group is also exploring alternative shark control technologies including non-lethal methods.

"If the captured shark is alive but deemed dangerous, it would be euthanised by a professional Shark Control Program contractor who is highly trained in humane methods to kill a shark.

"Shark control equipment is serviced every second day, weather permitting, by independent contractors who work under the supervision of the Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol.”



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