Surfers are being invited to participate in an online survey which will provide valuable information on injury rates, types and severity of injury, skin cancer and general surf safety.
Surfers are being invited to participate in an online survey which will provide valuable information on injury rates, types and severity of injury, skin cancer and general surf safety.

Surfers needed for wipeout study

SURFING is an iconic part of Australian life but it does come with a degree of risk.

Southern Cross University is undertaking a study to investigate the prevalence of injuries among Australian surfers and they are looking for help with this research.

The study is being conducted in conjunction with Surfing Australia and with funding received from the New South Wales Sporting Injuries Committee.

The research team is led by Dr Rudi Meir and involves other staff from the University’s School of Health and Human Sciences.

“This project will examine one aspect of participation in the form of injury prevalence and we certainly hope to ultimately conduct more research in this sport,” Dr Meir said.

As part of the study, surfers are being invited to participate in an online survey which will provide valuable information on injury rates, types and severity of injury, skin cancer and general surf safety.

Sport development manager for Surfing Australia Chris Symington said surfing was a great sport and enormously popular, with some 2.5 million participants in Australia.

“Surfing Australia is hoping this project will be the first of many that will shed more light on the sport and its participants,” Mr Symington said.

“Ultimately it may allow bodies such as Surfing Australia and the NSW Sport Injuries Committee to develop policies and guidelines that can work to further enhance the experience of surfers.”

Anyone who would like to participate should read the welcome page first, which outlines the nature of the research and participation in the survey at www.surveymonkey.com/s/surfinginjuryproject2010.

Anyone who takes part remains completely anonymous and the project has been approved by the Southern Cross University Human Research Ethics Committee.

This survey will only be available to access for approximately four weeks and will conclude on November 7.



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