TRAUMA SITUATION: Third year UQ medical students Marina Tan, Samuel Reeves and Mark Henderson undergo training with the Queensland Ambulance Service Bundaberg paramedics. Photo: Mike Knott / NewsMail
TRAUMA SITUATION: Third year UQ medical students Marina Tan, Samuel Reeves and Mark Henderson undergo training with the Queensland Ambulance Service Bundaberg paramedics. Photo: Mike Knott / NewsMail Mike Knott

Student doctors participate in QAS trauma training

AMPUTATED legs, surgery to blocked airways and confined-space rescues were just some of the emergencies that 20 student doctors faced when they participated in a training day with Queensland Ambulance Service paramedics yesterday.

The University of Queensland third-year medical students were put through their paces when they were placed in a number of mock trauma scenarios under the guidance of some of Bundaberg's paramedics at the site for the new station on Wyllie St, Thabeban.

Acting manager of clinical education for Wide Bay LASN Ruth Christie said the training day was part of the students rural rotation orientation and aimed at imparting the knowledge that paramedics had in managing traumas in the pre-hospital environment.

"We had someone who had fallen off a roof, someone who had fallen over in their garden with a picket through their abdomen, an amputation scenario and confined space tunnel rescue. There has bee a whole gamut of things," she said.

"It's dirty, it's messy there are spiders, it's hot. All of the things that we as paramedics manage, we are giving these guys a taste of it."

Third year UQ medical student Nathan Quigley participated in the training day and said each emergency scenario came with its own set of challenges.

"We had a lady in a tunnel who collapsed and her legs where pinned and broken. That was challenging," he said.

"We had the dynamic of trying to manage the family who were almost interfering because they were so upset and also trying to work in a very dark and confined space. You have to improvise on the spot so that was quite difficult."

Ms Christie said QAS Bundaberg were thrilled to be asked to provide trauma and emergency education to the visiting students.

"It is a real testament to our paramedics skill and knowledge. Our people are incredibly educated right from diplomas, master degrees, graduate certificates in intensive care and paramedicine," she said.

"When these guys (student doctors) graduate they will have some experience in trauma that they can take through in their practice as medical doctors."

 

 



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