ABSENT: With only one day left until the students of Bundaberg head back to school for a new year, data shows the high schools where kids are skipping classes the most.
ABSENT: With only one day left until the students of Bundaberg head back to school for a new year, data shows the high schools where kids are skipping classes the most. Marian Faa

State high schools in Bundaberg below national average

WITH only one day left until the students of Bundaberg pack their lunches and head back to school for a new year, data shows the high schools where kids are skipping classes the most.

One of Bundaberg's high schools, Shalom College, was recently unveiled as having the best attendance performance of schools across the state in 2018.

However, the NewsMail can reveal it wasn't such a pretty picture at some of our other schools.

Data from the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, which records attendance rates for students for the first semester, shows Queensland students across Years 1-10 attended school less than those in the other major states last year.

It seems parents who pay more for private schools have a better chance of keeping their kids in school, with the latest data showing local state schools below private in attendance.

Shalom College topped the list of schools with the best attendance rate recorded for schools with more than 1000 pupils, with its eligible students attending about 98 per cent of the time and an attendance level at 95 per cent.

Attendance rate refers to the number of actual full-time equivalent student days attended by full-time students in Years 1-10 as a percentage of the total number of possible student days.

Attendance level refers to the proportion of full-time students in Years 1-10 whose attendance rate is equal to or greater than 90 per cent.

Data is for semester one last year.

At the other end of the spectrum is Bundaberg State High School. There the attendance rate was 87 per cent but the attendance level was just 55 per cent.

Two other state high schools were similar, with Bundaberg North State High School hitting an attendance rate of 86per cent and level of 57 per cent.

Kepnock State High School only reached a little higher, with a rate of 88 per cent and level of 57 per cent.

The last state school on the list was Isis State High, which was slighter better than the Bundaberg high schools.

It had an attendance rate of 89 per cent and a level of 63 per cent.

For the two other private high schools, excluding Shalom, St Luke's Anglican School fared a little better than Bundaberg Christian College.

St Luke's had an attendance rate of 93 per cent and a level of 79 per cent, while BCC had a 93per cent attendance rate and 77 per cent level.

For the first semester last year, Queensland students' overall attendance record slipped to 91.5 per cent and now sits below the national average (91.9 per cent).

In 2016 and 2017, the state's attendance rate was the third-highest in the country, behind Victoria and NSW.

But in 2018 Queensland's rate fell behind Western Australia, South Australia and the ACT and for primary school students only the Northern Territory had a lower attendance rate.

Queensland Education Minister Grace Grace said the majority of students across the state attended school at least 90 per cent of the time but there was a range of factors that could keep children from school.

"To put it simply, every day counts (and) attending school every day is vital to ensuring our children get the education they need to get a great start in their lives," Ms Grace said.

"In Queensland, parents have a legal obligation to ensure their child attends school on every school day for the educational program in which the child is enrolled, unless the parent has a reasonable excuse for not doing so.

"Improving student attendance requires communities to work together."

In 2018, boys attended school less often than girls across all year levels in Queensland, with Year 10 male students recording the lowest levels.

For Queensland female students, Year 9 pupils were the most likely to miss school.



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