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Shoppers beware of trolley collisions, especially on Fridays

New data from NRMA Insurance has revealed that last year in Queensland, Friday was the most common day for drivers to have a run in with a shopping trolley, with collisions peaking at 10am and 3pm.
New data from NRMA Insurance has revealed that last year in Queensland, Friday was the most common day for drivers to have a run in with a shopping trolley, with collisions peaking at 10am and 3pm. Tony Martin

SHOPPERS are on the lookout for more than a bargain on Fridays with shopping trolley collisions at their peak.  

New data from NRMA Insurance has revealed that last year in Queensland, Friday was the most common day for drivers to have a run in with a shopping trolley, with collisions peaking at 10am and 3pm.

The insurer is calling for shoppers to take care in car parks, with a survey revealing one in two Australians don't return their shopping trolley to a designated bay.
 
According to Australian shoppers, the top reasons for abandoning a shopping trolley in a car park are:
•    Not being able to find the shopping trolley return bay (41%);
•    The shopping trolley return bay being full (24%);
•    Couldn't be bothered (19%); and
•    Not having time to return the shopping trolley to a designated bay (16%).

Vote in our poll below

Do you return your shopping trolley to a designated bay?

This poll ended on 14 March 2016.

Current Results

Always. I give dirty looks to people who don't

58%

I do when a free trolley bay is nearby

33%

Life's too short. I can't be bothered

8%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

NRMA Insurance head of research Robert McDonald warns that stray shopping trolleys can cause serious damage to cars.
 
"It's not uncommon for shopping trolleys to be filled to the brim, and heavy trolleys are more difficult to control, particularly given many appear to have a mind of their own," Mr McDonald said.
 
"If trolleys are left unattended or in the hands of a child, a loaded shopping trolley can easily reach speeds of up to 15km/h after travelling just a few metres.
 
"A prang with a shopping trolley on average can cause $1,800 worth of damage, so a quick dash to the shops could cost you more than you think."
 
Typical shopping trolley collisions involve rogue trolleys rolling into parked cars, cars pulling into parking spaces with shopping trolleys in them, or scrapes caused when trolleys are pushed past parked cars.
 
"Shopping trolleys are often left carelessly in parking spots or against poles, making it difficult for people to park and maneuver around car parks," Mr McDonald said.
 
"The designated trolley return bays are there for a reason, so it's important shoppers are responsible and thoughtful of others by returning trolleys to their rightful place."
 




 
 

Topics:  car parks



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