Outdoor supervisor Charlie Webster, volunteer gardener Thomas Bolton and leading hand gardener Ray Gough in the Salvation Army Tom Quinn Community Centre gardens.
Outdoor supervisor Charlie Webster, volunteer gardener Thomas Bolton and leading hand gardener Ray Gough in the Salvation Army Tom Quinn Community Centre gardens. Mike Knott

Bundy gears for bloom

THE garden workers at the Salvation Army Tom Quinn Community Centre are not resting on their laurels this year.

After winning the crown of Grand Champion Garden in the Bundy in Bloom festival last year, they are continuing their hard work with an eye to this year’s spring celebrations in Bundaberg next month.

Centre site supervisor Charlie Webster said there was no real secret to the garden’s success last year.

“We use mulch that reduces weeds, encourages worms and holds moisture,” he said.

“Occasionally we put in a bit of cow manure or horse manure.”

Every vegetable, plant and tree in the gardens is organic, and parts have been planned and planted to prevent erosion of the creek that runs through the centre’s grounds.

Mr Webster said the centre’s gardens had erosion and vegetation problems.

“When we had a lot of rain, the water used to gush down to the creek and cause all sorts of issues,” he said.

The solution was to create a “natural”, softly sloping run-off from small rocks which protected the area by containing and slowing the water.

The centre’s Ray Gough then led a team that planted a range of suitable plants, including ferns, graphtophyllun, rhoeos, cordylines and coleus to create a cool, calm haven.

The gardens are open to the public every day between 9am and 4pm.

Entries to the garden competition close at 4.45pm on August 30, and the judging will start the week of September 13.



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