Dorothy Bunn and Tina Mammino are off to Rome for the canonisation of Mary of the Cross MacKillop, with his Holiness Pope Benedict XVI in Rome's St Peters Square on October 17.
Dorothy Bunn and Tina Mammino are off to Rome for the canonisation of Mary of the Cross MacKillop, with his Holiness Pope Benedict XVI in Rome's St Peters Square on October 17. Gary Hutchison

Saintly ties lead to visit

A SPECIAL family connection compels Childers resident Dorothy Bunn's attendance at the canonisation of Mary of the Cross MacKillop, with his Holiness Pope Benedict XVI in Rome's St Peters Square on October 17.

Mrs Bunn's great, great, great uncle Father Patrick Bonaventura Geoghegan conducted the service at Mary MacKillop's parents' wedding, baptised her and gave Australia's soon-to-be inaugural saint her first communion.

“My great, great grandmother travelled from Ireland with her brother to Port Phillip, now Melbourne, where he built St Francis' Church,” Mrs Bunn said.

“And it was from there he became involved with the MacKillop family.”

The life-long Isis resident said that as a child attending the St Josephs Catholic School, she always felt an aura from Blessed Mary MacKillop's photo on the wall.

“It wasn't until I read a couple of books that I became aware of my family ties,” she said.

And it is because of a life-long connection with the Mammino family that Mrs Bunn will be joined on her travels to the Papal city by Tina Mammino.

“Dorothy and my late husband Alf went to school together,” Mrs Mammino said.

“I first met her after I married Alf in 1959 and moved to Childers.”

Since then the pair have been great friends and their respective children have attended St Josephs Primary School and been active members of the Sacred Heart Catholic parish.

The Childers ladies will leave Australia together on October 9.



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