Rural Fire Brigade warden Rod Hartwig suffered serious burns fighting to save his own house from a devastating blaze.
Rural Fire Brigade warden Rod Hartwig suffered serious burns fighting to save his own house from a devastating blaze. Rebecca's Photographics

Firie injured in blaze at home

A RURAL fire warden has been seriously injured fighting a house fire on his own property.

Rod Hartwig fought in vain to save his 100-year-old colonial house after his wife, Barbara, raised the alarm when a fire started in one of the bedrooms.

He tried to contain the fire because he already had a Rural Fire Brigade truck on the property, at Cynthia near Eidsvold, but the fire took hold too quickly and the pair lost all their possessions.

Mrs Hartwig raced to a nearby property to call for help, as the landline could not be used and there was no mobile reception available.

By the time Queensland Fire and Rescue arrived at the scene, the house was well alight and Mr Hartwig had been forced to retreat from the fire with serious burns.

Hampering the firefighting effort was the unavailability of water on the property, which required a council water truck to back up firefighters' efforts.

Exploding ammunition also caused problems.

Acting Sergeant Jeremy Young, from Eidsvold Police, confirmed ammunition was legally stored in a safe room in the house but presented a hazardous situation to firefighters arriving on the scene.

Queensland Ambulance Service acting officer in charge Scott Wicks said Mr Hartwig was taken to Mundubbera Hospital, where he was awaiting evacuation to the Royal Brisbane Hospital Burns Unit.

The cause of the fire is unknown but is being investigated. Donations of any kind to the Hartwigs can be left at the Eidsvold Ambulance Station.



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