Moore Park beach locals Don Mega, Brenden Petersen and Jamie Walker found a novel way to enjoy a rainy afternoon.Photo: SCOTTIE SIMMONDS 0802b
Moore Park beach locals Don Mega, Brenden Petersen and Jamie Walker found a novel way to enjoy a rainy afternoon.Photo: SCOTTIE SIMMONDS 0802b

Roads closed as the heavens open

DON Mega and his mates found a new way to get around Moore Park Beach as the streets flooded on Sunday afternoon.

While police have warned against playing in floodwaters, a kayak may become the only option for some residents in low-lying areas.

With more rain forecast for the region, roads could be about to go under again.

Moore Park Beach resident Scott Simmonds said the water levels had been up and down all day yesterday.

“It’s still extremely wet,” Mr Simmonds said.

“The roads are all open at the moment, but the water is lapping at the edges so if it rains any more it will cross the roads again.”

Residents in Baffle Creek, who spent most of last week cut off from the outside world, were relieved life had started to go back to normal yesterday, but a number of roads, including Tablelands Road, remained impassable.

“The school buses are running again, and now there’s only a few causeways under water,” Baffle Creek SES group leader Calvin Johnstone said.

He said newspapers, bread and milk were ferried to the Baffle Creek shop so locals did not run short, and despite the isolation, there were few problems.

“We only evacuated two people — one with a medical condition and one tourist who had to leave because his visa was expiring,” he said.

But Mr Johnstone said the community was preparing to be cut off again later this week after heavy showers and storms were forecast for today and Wednesday.

“The Essendean bridge is open at the moment, but if Miriam Vale gets any more rain, we’ll be cut off again,” he said.

“Generally it takes about 12 to 18 hours after it’s rained for the waters to rise here, so we will wait and see.”

Police warned drivers to take care and slow down when travelling in heavy rain and on water-affected roads.

“Road conditions may be difficult to assess after dark and water depth and storm debris hard to accurately detect,” a police spokesperson said.

Parents are also being urged to discourage children from playing in waterways which are affected by flooding.

Water levels and conditions can change rapidly, causing dangerous currents and storm surges.

Keep up-to-date with latest weather information for Bundaberg.



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