Gladstone drivers copped $720,000 in speeding fines in 2017.
Gladstone drivers copped $720,000 in speeding fines in 2017. Valerie Horton

REVEALED: How much speeding costs Gladstone

LEADFOOTS in Gladstone racked up more than $700,000 in speeding fines in 12 months.

A Right to Information investigation has revealed police handed out 3571 speeding tickets across the Gladstone and surrounding police divisions in 2017.

Those fines cost motorists $720,728, enough to pay the wages for 10 primary school teachers or registered nurses.

More than 2600 tickets were handed out to speeders driving less than 13km/h over the limit. A further 750 were caught driving 14-20km/h over the limit, 159 motorists were fined for speeding 21-30km/h and 23 fines were given to drivers doing 31-40km/h over the limit.

Eight drivers were hit with a $1117 fine for driving more than 40km/h over the limit, the highest speeding category.

One of the region's top doctors, central Queensland-based Australian Medical Association Queensland president Bill Boyd, said even low-speed crashes could kill.

"The speed limits are set based on the condition of the road, but the reality is you can sustain or cause severe injuries even driving at 60km/h around town," he said.

"You have to drive to the road conditions and drive for the unexpected. When you're in control of a vehicle you are responsible for your decisions and actions."

Dr Boyd said attending major crashes could take a toll on medical staff and emergency workers.

"It's our job to help people in these situations, but it doesn't mean we are not affected by it. It can be traumatic for everyone involved - the victims, emergency service workers and medical staff," he said.

 

Queensland regional road policing boss Inspector Peter Flanders said even doing 10km/h over the limit significantly increased the chance of a crash turning deadly.

"The physics behind speeding are stark. If you are in a 40 zone driving at 50km/h, that extra 10km/h increases your kinetic energy by one and a half times," he said.

"To put it simply, if you hit a kid you are hitting them one and a half times harder."

Inspector Flanders said braking also took longer at higher speeds, making it harder to avoid a potential accident.

"In that same situation, driving at 50km/h in a 40 zone, it'll take about twice as long to brake as if you were doing the limit."-NewsRegional



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