Registered wildlife carer Christine Wynne with a baby possum.
Registered wildlife carer Christine Wynne with a baby possum. Mike Knott

Relocating birds not the answer

AN Elliott Heads wildlife carer has disputed claims that relocating problem magpies was not a cruel practice.

Christine Wynne said breaking up a pair of nesting magpies could leave both birds vulnerable.

“We had an incident here last year when someone complained about a magpie and the bird was relocated,” she said.

“The female magpie couldn't cope with getting food and raising her two chicks, and she was eventually hunted to death by other magpies in the area.”

Ms Wynne said one of the chicks died and the other had to be taken in by carers.

She said the relocated male was also vulnerable to attack if there were other magpies in his new area.

“The nesting season only lasts about a month. Surely people can do things like putting those wires in their cycling helmets or painting eyes on them for that time,” she said.

“Magpies also seem to attack people more frequently when they're on a bike, so maybe they could get off and walk for a bit.”

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