RACQ has expressed its frustration at the ongoing battle to get cut-through on mobile phone use and driving, comparing it to where drink driving was 20 years ago.

RACQ said motorists had ignored all previous campaigns and penalties, and it was time to stop the arrogance of drivers thinking it's okay to drive and use their phone.

RACQ spokesperson Renee Smith has called on Queensland motorists to take the dangers of mobile phone use and driving seriously.

Do you use your phone when you're driving?

This poll ended on 15 August 2015.

Current Results

Yes, I admit it, I take my eyes off the road sometimes to check my phone

16%

Never, it's not worth the risk

33%

I only use my phone with hands-free technology

50%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

"Distracted driving, particularly talking or texting on a mobile, is fast becoming number one in the Fatal Five for killing Queenslanders," Ms Smith said.

"It's time for some motorists to stop thinking that using handheld mobile phones won't impact their driving. The reality is, by using them they're taking a deadly risk.

"As new technology continues to emerge - distraction which includes texting and driving is an issue we're not only dealing with in Queensland, it's a global issue."

From next month, double the demerit penalty for repeat offenders who used handheld devices would be introduced in Queensland, costing motorists six demerit points and a $340 fine.

Ms Smith said RACQ supported the move, and hoped it would lead to a reduction in offences.

"Queenslanders must realise that holding a phone while driving can have deadly consequences," she said.



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