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Police urge people with information to come forward

Bundaberg’s Nikki Stevenson lives in hope that her father, Paul Stevenson who went missing on Sunday, March 11, 2012 will one day walk back into their lives.
Bundaberg’s Nikki Stevenson lives in hope that her father, Paul Stevenson who went missing on Sunday, March 11, 2012 will one day walk back into their lives. Mike Knott

IN QUEENSLAND an average of 6500 people are reported missing each year and while the recovery rate is quite high, one Bundaberg family is still seeking answers.

This week is National Missing Persons Week, a week aimed at raising awareness of the thousands of people reported missing each year across Australia.

Bundaberg's Nikki Stevenson lives in hope that her father, Paul Stevenson who went missing on Sunday, March 11, 2012 will one day walk back into their lives.

The 21-year-old said she simply wanted answers.

"It is a very important week for us because it raises dad's case again," she said.

"We have reached a dead end with the case and we just want answers.

"We hope the week offers the opportunity to jog someone's memory."

In Queensland, the campaign is being supported by Alzheimer's Australia Queensland in order to highlight the links between missing persons and dementia.

Of the 6500 people reported missing, about 300 were older persons and some of these were living with dementia.

Alzheimer's Australia Queensland spokeswoman Kerry Cutting said bracelets designed to be worn by those suffering from dementia would give peace of mind to those caring for people with the disease.

The bracelets will be available through Alzheimer's Australia Queensland at a small cost.

Each bracelet is uniquely numbered to enable the wearer to be identified by police when found and is designed so that it can only be removed using two hands to prevent the wearer from inadvertently removing it.

"Caring for another person is a huge responsibility and when they go missing it can be incredibly distressing, especially if the person you're caring for is a loved one," she said

"These bracelets are not only a safe guard for those who do go wandering, but a great peace of mind for those caring for someone with dementia."

Bundaberg Detective Sergeant Cameron Schneider said it was a common misconception that you couldn't report a missing person until 24 hours after they went missing.

"If a person has any concern for the whereabouts of any person that they think is missing it can be reported to police," he said.

"There is no time limit."
 

Topics:  alzheimer's missing person paul stevenson police



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