PLAN: The Queensland Museum is in talks with traditional owners.
PLAN: The Queensland Museum is in talks with traditional owners. Max Fleet

Plan for engravings

THE Queensland Museum is in talks with traditional owners to put in place a plan for the treatment of the rock engravings in the region.

The move comes as controversy erupted over the removal of four rocks with indigenous engravings on them from the Bingera Mill.

The Gidarjil Development Corporation says it was the cultural heritage body responsible for the rocks and they should not have been moved without its input.

Professor Suzanne Miller, CEO and director of the Queensland Museum Network, said in the 1970s the museum registered the pieces into the state collection, but no loan agreement was put in place at the time.

She said the museum was not informed the rocks were to be moved.

"The museum has begun discussions with the traditional owners to develop a long term plan for the rock engravings and to put in place loan agreements, which will outline a plan for their custodianship and conservation," she said.

Prof Miller said the engravings that had been moved were part of a larger collection of 92 rock engravings.

"The museum is beginning the process of updating information on all these engravings with a view to contacting current holders in order to make them aware that they form part of the state collection and their obligations to the traditional owners," she said.

Gidarjil managing director Kerry Blackman said they were working with the museum on a preservation and maintenance plan.



Bundy to be a sea of maroon as footy champions visit

Premium Content Bundy to be a sea of maroon as footy champions visit

Meet your heroes: The Queensland State of Origin team will visit Bundaberg for a...

VC hero fronts Qld colleagues after expletive-riddled spray

Premium Content VC hero fronts Qld colleagues after expletive-riddled spray

Ben Roberts-Smith fronts colleagues after ‘smiling assassins’ leak