Keith Pitt at Burnett Heads announcing a pre-feasibility study to assess the viability of an outer harbour at the Port of Bundaberg.
Keith Pitt at Burnett Heads announcing a pre-feasibility study to assess the viability of an outer harbour at the Port of Bundaberg. Brian Cassidy

Pitt likely to serve in opposition; what it means for Bundy

FOLLOWING a professional election campaign by Hinkler MP Keith Pitt he is likely to find himself in opposition to a Labor-led government after Saturday,

That is the prediction of Brian Courtice, who was Hinkler's Labor member from 1987 to 1993.

"If you're picking a winner it's like picking Winx in a race,” Mr Courtice, a columnist for the NewsMail, said.

"He (Mr Pitt) will win by a length of a straight and it would be foolish to say otherwise.”

He said two terms of experience as the LNP Member for Hinkler had served as a good training ground for Mr Pitt, who had also put the electorate first by stepping back from a ministry position.

"That takes a lot of courage, and I tend to think Keith Pitt has got a tonne of morale courage,” Mr Courtice said.

"It is daunting and difficult for anyone to run against him on that basis.”

Mr Courtice said the current Labor candidate, Richard Pascoe, had not raised a high profile until recently.

"He didn't seem to be out there until the last 10 days, and didn't seem to be utilising the opportunities media gave him,” he said.

"I believe he performed quite well at the forum (on Monday night), as did some of the other independent or minor party candidates.”

As for the federal outcome, Mr Courtice said it was likely that Bill Shorten was to become the Prime Minister due to the redistribution of electorates in Victoria which has favoured Labor.

The reported sacking of a Gladstone Port contractor after he asked Mr Shorten a question involving taxation against high income workers earlier this month will favour Flynn's LNP member Ken O'Dowd.

"I know Gladstone people well because they were part of my electorate,” Mr Courtice said.

"They don't stand for intimidation like that.”

According to an economics expert it's going to be much harder for Mr Pitt to get projects over the line.

CQUniversity regional economics professor John Rolfe said it was more challenging for members sitting with the Opposition in non-marginal seats to get non-priority projects actioned.

"When there's a strong case for action, it doesn't matter too much which side the representative is on,” he said.

"If a member is within the government it is easier for that person to make contacts and representations,” he said.

"But, if the seat is not marginal (and the member is part of the Opposition), it's really only those gold-plated cases that get through.”