HUXHAM STANDS: Damian Huxham will represent Pauline Hanson's One Nation in the seat of Hinkler at next year's federal election.
HUXHAM STANDS: Damian Huxham will represent Pauline Hanson's One Nation in the seat of Hinkler at next year's federal election. Jocelyn Watts

One Nation reveals candidate in battle for Hinkler

DAMIAN Huxham will again fight for the seat of Hinkler, with One Nation announcing him as their chosen candidate for the second time.

Announcing his intention to run on Thursday night, Mr Huxham said employment issues and high cost of living still plagued the region's residents.

"Since the re-election of the current member nothing has improved within our Hinkler electorate,” said Mr Huxham, who contested the seat in 2016.

"Unemployment, underemployment, electricity and even the cost of living rose whilst infrastructure and employment opportunities stagnated.”

The FIFO heavy plant operator captured 16,987 votes in 2016. This was 19.16 per cent of the vote. Mr Pitt won with 43.8 per cent of the primary vote (38,887 votes).

Since then the LNP performed poorly in the Queensland election and the current Morrison Government has struggled following the decision to remove Malcolm Turnbull as Prime Minister.

While there are some talking up One Nation's chances, a political expert says the party is unlikely to force National party incumbent Keith Pitt out of Hinkler.

Adjunct associate professor at James Cook University Dr Doug Hunt predicts Mr Pitt will hold on.

"In order to have a chance of winning, the One Nation candidate would need to have come second in the previous race,” Dr Hunt said.

Dr Hunt said the LNP had a stronghold over the Hinkler region, but said that wasn't the case in other areas of regional Queensland.

"History shows One Nation would be doing very well to get around to a 20 per cent mark, but I think that Keith Pitt is probably going to win again,” he said.

"Queensland is the heartland of One Nation ... and it is a party that appeals to people's genuine sense of grievance, and harvests the feelings of the large, if not the majority of the electorate, that the other parties are not worth their support. It's a protest vote.

"That has much to do with disconnection from politics and a disconnection to the major parties, so rather than anything specific appealing to people about their policies, it's about the rhetoric and the appeal to that sense of grievance and sense of disaffection with the mainstream political parties.”

Mr Pitt yesterday said the minor parties had no way to deliver promises.

"The minor parties will promise everything and deliver nothing,” Mr Pitt said. "They have no way of delivering anything they commit to.”



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