One Nation leader Senator Pauline Hanson. Picture: AAP/Mick Tsikas
One Nation leader Senator Pauline Hanson. Picture: AAP/Mick Tsikas

Hanson pushes for immigration plebiscite

PAULINE Hanson is pushing for a public vote that will allow Australians to have a say on whether the nation's immigration cap should be drastically scaled back.

The One Nation leader has told The Australian she will push for the plebiscite on migration levels to be held at the same time as the next federal election.

Her suggestion comes ahead of a key by-election in the Queensland seat of Longman, where One Nation is on track to secure almost 15 per cent of the vote, according to new polling in The Courier-Mail today.

"You've got to have people who are actually voters in this country having a say on this," Senator Hanson told The Australian.

One Nation leader Senator Pauline Hanson. Picture: AAP/Mick Tsikas
One Nation leader Senator Pauline Hanson. Picture: AAP/Mick Tsikas

"The question to be put would be along the lines of 'what level of immigration should we be taking into Australia?' or possibly even asking people 'what is the population they can see that would be sustainable for Australia's way of life and standard of living?'"

Senator Hanson reportedly intends to give notice in the Senate today that she will introduce the push for a plebiscite when Parliament resumes in August.

Do you support the proposal for a plebiscite on immigration levels?

This poll ended on 28 July 2018.

Current Results

Yes

63%

No

27%

Unsure

9%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

The issue flared earlier this year when former Prime Minister Tony Abbott called for the immigration cap to be cut from 190,000 to 110,000.

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has also reportedly canvased pairing back the cap by 20,000.

Polling has shown a majority of Australians (56 per cent) believe the current cap is too high.

Senator Hanson told The Australian she wanted an official plebiscite, not a postal vote that was used in the same-sex marriage vote.

She has told the publication government support for her plan would not win her support for its corporate tax cuts.

"We have high levels of ­migration coming in from foreign students, visa holders, and foreign workers," Senator Hanson said.

"The impact it's having on Australia is overcrowding in our cities, the housing shortage and (the ­taking up of) jobs.

"Also, the government has been keeping up high immigration numbers to make their budget ­papers look good."

Treasury modelling released earlier this year showed that far from being a welfare burden, migrants boosted the federal budget's bottom line by billions.



Married 60 years and stronger than ever

premium_icon Married 60 years and stronger than ever

While life has thrown a few curve balls their way, nothing could cause a rift in...

Socials: Nothing but paradise at Bargara markets

premium_icon Socials: Nothing but paradise at Bargara markets

Paradise Markets went off with a bang on Sunday with plenty of local residents...