Lean how to get out of the repetitive cycle of violence.
Lean how to get out of the repetitive cycle of violence. Rich Pedroncelli

Not my family, never my child

WHILE Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs begins with what we as humans need to survive, Not My Family Never My Children is founded on what we need to thrive - love, trust and security.

With mental health issues, and drug and physical abuse quickly becoming society's plague, two women are trying to make the family home a safe haven again.

Georgia Phillips and Kym Haynes' program Not My Family Never My Children is dedicated to ending the repetitive cycle of abuse in its various forms within a family.

Ms Phillips said that when abusive relationships consume one's reality it not only affects them but also all of those who are associated with them.

The program focuses on overcoming issues of addiction, depression or anxiety, PTSD, bullying and domestic violence to bring families together again.

"Some people don't understand addiction, they don't know they've got it and they don't know what they need.” Ms Phillips, a former police officer and guidance counsellor, said.

The campaign is supported by organisations such as Headspace, Partners in Recovery and other leading mental illness companies and victims themselves to provide the most effective advice.

The group leaders are people who have suffered and recovered from various additions.

Ms Phillips believes their first-hand knowledge makes the program an approachable and productive discussion with an in-depth understanding of the hardship, emotionally and physically, associated with addiction.

"People saying, just stop using and you'll be fine, isn't going to help them,” she said.

"What we try and give people is a language they can communicate with and the skills to deal with addiction.

"We are no longer choosing our reality, we are unconscious and not making choices that meet our needs.”

Having reformed her own life, Ms Phillips states that everyone can change or improve their situation.

"I've done it, everyone can do it.

"We all really matter and are all important.

"We all have the need for love and yet we are unsure how to have it.”

The Addictive World is touring Bundaberg next Wednesday, September 28 at the IWC.

It is here in Bundaberg that the program is expected to have the biggest turnout yet with 40-50 people in attendance.

To stop unstable and loveless households becoming the norm in today's society, contact The Addictive World on 0732062550 for help or guidance.



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