Meeting outside Noosa's Black Satanic Mass is president of LGBTI Rainbow Noosa Lesley Pantlin and a group of Catholics.
Meeting outside Noosa's Black Satanic Mass is president of LGBTI Rainbow Noosa Lesley Pantlin and a group of Catholics.

Noosa’s Satanic Mass goes ahead against all Gods

It made headlines around the world and as predicted, the Noosa Satanist Black Mass event was an unusual sight for the coastal town.

The 30-minute mass went off without a hitch on Friday despite over 100,000 people from around the world signing a petition to halt the event.

Staff at The J Theatre and event host Robin Bristow received months of threats in the lead up to the Satanic Mass.

Noosa Temple of Satan founder Robin Bristow hands out business cards before the Black Mass begins.
Noosa Temple of Satan founder Robin Bristow hands out business cards before the Black Mass begins.

Members of the LGBTI group Rainbow Noosa held a vigil outside which added colour to an otherwise strictly black dress code.

Rainbow Noosa president Lesley Pantlin lead her troops wearing a witch outfit and holding a rainbow-coloured flag to signify her belief that all religions should be given equal rights.

"If there is freedom of religions it has to be for all religions," she said.

"I'm not really a witch, I am a political witch."

Rainbow Noosa President Lesley Pantlin with Stuart Macloud outside The J Theatre in the lead up to Noosa Satanist Black Mass.
Rainbow Noosa President Lesley Pantlin with Stuart Macloud outside The J Theatre in the lead up to Noosa Satanist Black Mass.

A small group of Catholics holding bibles and a large religious cross held a silent protest only metres from the LGBTI group.

Neither party took much notice of each other.

A small group of Catholics held a silent protest outside Noosa's Satanic Black Mass.
A small group of Catholics held a silent protest outside Noosa's Satanic Black Mass.

Satanist Rin Dwyer drove from Redcliffe specifically for the event.

Dressed in a black cloak and a Black Sabbath t-shirt, Mr Dwyer was initially drawn to Satanism as he believes it represents rebellion, religious freedom and critical thinking.

"I prefer critical thinking and scientific thought versus following an arbitrary set of rules and beliefs on some superior moral high ground," he said.

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Mr Dwyer admit he was initially concerned by the threat of violence by attending the event, but he said it was important to stand up for what he believed in.

"I am concerned but my mum was more concerned than I was," he said.

"You've got to get out and show you have no fear. You can't let bullies keep you down."

Mr Dwyer had no issues with the group of Catholics showing up at the Satanist Mass.

"I am happy to have them here, I am happy to respect them being here," he said.

The group of Catholics were approached for comment.



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