Jane Truscott.
Jane Truscott.

'No one size fits all in education', says Truscott

THE question is out there, should children with disabilities such as autism be allowed to go to a mainstream school?

It comes after Pauline Hanson was under fire for suggesting autistic children be removed from mainstream classrooms to stop "normal" kids being held back.

The One Nation leader made the comments during debate on the Federal Government's proposed schools overhaul in the Senate on Wednesday, insisting that parents and teachers had raised the matter with her.

Teachers were devoting much of their time to disabled children, to the detriment of other students in the classroom, she said.

Member for Hinkler Keith Pitt has attacked Ms Hanson asking her to please explain.

One Nation leader Senator Pauline Hanson leaves after speaking in the Senate chamber at Parliament House in Canberra, Wednesday, May 10, 2017. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas) NO ARCHIVING
One Nation leader Senator Pauline Hanson leaves after speaking in the Senate chamber at Parliament House in Canberra, Wednesday, May 10, 2017. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas) NO ARCHIVING MICK TSIKAS

"I have seen Senator Hanson's comments and can I say that I think she's got to explain herself," Mr Pitt said.

"The reality is, it's not just her, it is every single candidate that's standing for One Nation, particularly in the state of Queensland, if you are a One Nation candidate is this something you agree with?"

Mr Pitt said the government clearly did not agree with Senator Hanson's statement.

One Nation candidate for Bundaberg Jane Truscott is at odds with the One Nation founder and federal leader.

Dr Truscott said education was the cornerstone of our society and providing a valuable educational experience for all children was a complex matter.

"Those with disabilities may present challenges for both educators and families which require an awareness and understanding of social and behavioural issues," she said.

"Our children deserve to learn within an inclusive environment.

"Principals, teachers and parents should be equipped with skills and resources to meet the needs of children with special needs."

Dr Truscott had spoken with parents of children with special needs in Bundaberg and said they were typically supportive of having their child in mainstream education but also recognised there needed to be adequate resourcing to make it happen.

She said it needs to be a 'student-centric' approach.

"Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may have a complex presentation of difficulties with social interaction," Dr Truscott said.

"There is no "one size fits all"."



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