Australian Survivor contestant Nick Iadanza.
Australian Survivor contestant Nick Iadanza. Channel 10

Nick 'the snake' to call the shots on Survivor jury

AUSTRALIAN Survivor evictee Nick Iadanza has won the next best thing to the reality show's $500,000 grand prize.

The Survivor super fan turned contestant , who was nicknamed 'the snake' by Sam Webb, is the first member of the final jury, which will ultimately decide the show's winner.

"Being the first member of the jury is a huge accomplishment," Mr Iadanza told APN.

"It means you get to set the tone. Now that I'm out I can put the game behind me but also come into Tribal Council and view the votes and make sure we make the right decision in the end. I want to give the money to the person who played the game in the spirit it was meant to be played."

The 27-year-old said tonight's elimination came as no surprise after he became increasingly isolated from his fellow castaways.

Australian Survivor contestant Nick Iadanza reflects after receiving letters from loved ones.
Australian Survivor contestant Nick Iadanza reflects after receiving letters from loved ones. Nigel Wright

"I felt like I'd been living on borrowed time for 20 something days since I was originally voted out (by Vavau)," he said.

"I think I had overstayed my welcome... I never believed how excited I would be to be voted out. You can see it all over my face. I just geek out like a big Survivor nerd."

He made no apologies for embracing the game's strategy component to the best of his ability.

"I understand in Australia we have these intrinsic values of mateship and a fair go but I don't see how that correlates to Survivor," he said.

"I approached the game from an American season 33 perspective, and that was to my detriment. I didn't read the room. I assumed everyone was going out for blood like I was. I've been dreaming about this for 16 years. I wasn't going to let mateship or any other Australian stereotypes get in my way."

While he felt misunderstood by the other contestants, Mr Iadanza said he had no complaints about how he has been portrayed on the show.

"I don't like when reality TV stars come off a show and complain about how they're portrayed," he said.

"I went out there with an intent where if I come across as a villain then I'm a villain.

Australian Survivor contestant Nick Iadanza, centre, pictured at Tribal Council.
Australian Survivor contestant Nick Iadanza, centre, pictured at Tribal Council. Channel 10

"The only label I cared about was Survivor contestant coming after my name. I was well liked (by the other contestants), I just wasn't to be trusted."

A new online series called The Jury Villa will follow the jury of eliminated contestants, as they return to modern comforts like hot showers and observe and analyse the remaining contestants.

"I had the run of that villa for two days; when can you say you've got a five-star resort to yourself?" he said.

"I'd lost nearly 10kg... I was exhausted and definitely ready to transition to the next phase of the game (as a jury member)."

Mr Iadanza said Elena 'El' Rowland and Brooke Jowett are the game's current front runners.

 "They're the two players who have all three components of the game: strategy, physical and social," he said.

"They're both amazing women and they are in no way 'mean girls'."

Australian Survivor continues on Sunday at 7.30pm on Channel 10.



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