Coalition faces election carnage despite Scott Morrison’s encouraging results. Picture: AAP
Coalition faces election carnage despite Scott Morrison’s encouraging results. Picture: AAP

Morrison not enough to save Coalition

JUST two weeks into the top job and Scott Morrison has already moved ahead of Opposition leader Bill Shorten as the preferred Prime Minister - but it doesn't look like the new PM's honeymoon boost will be enough to get voters on his party's side.

An exclusive Newspoll, conducted for The Australian between September 6-9, has the Coalition trailing Labor 44-56 on the two-party preferred vote. This makes it the 40th straight losing Newspoll for the current government.

 

Scott Morrison has already moved ahead of Opposition leader Bill Shorten as the preferred Prime Minister. Picture: Dylan Robinson
Scott Morrison has already moved ahead of Opposition leader Bill Shorten as the preferred Prime Minister. Picture: Dylan Robinson

 

And to rub salt into the wound, Labor has also lifted its primary vote a further point to 42 per cent on the back of the turmoil surrounding the government, which resulted in a bloodbath leadership spill on August 24.

Labor's solid primary vote marks the strongest support for the party in The Australian's Newspoll since the days following Kevin Rudd's dismissal in July 2010.

It is now almost at the level of popular support that led to Labor's 2007 landslide victory against John Howard.

Meanwhile, the Coalition primary vote increased one point from 33 to 34 per cent.

 

Malcolm Turnbull was toppled in a brutal leadership spill on August 24. Picture by Sean Davey
Malcolm Turnbull was toppled in a brutal leadership spill on August 24. Picture by Sean Davey

 

Mr Morrison's honeymoon boost has seen him overtake Labor leader Bill Shorten as preferred Prime Minister, at 42 to 36 per cent - a result which also makes him a more popular leader than Malcolm Turnbull.

His performance ratings were also encouraging, with 41 per cent of voters satisfied and 39 per cent dissatisfied.

 

Bill Shorten didn’t fare well in his performance ratings. Picture: AAP
Bill Shorten didn’t fare well in his performance ratings. Picture: AAP

 

Mr Shorten, on the other hand, didn't benefit from the leadership spill, with 51 per cent of voters dissatisfied with his performance and just 37 per cent of voters satisfied.

This article originally appeared in The Australian.



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