Bride Kirsten Mears trashed her wedding dress at Smiths Crossing.
Bride Kirsten Mears trashed her wedding dress at Smiths Crossing. Rhondda Scott Boutique Photography

New style of wedding photos

A PERFECT wedding photograph is no longer about sitting serenely on a chair in the Bundaberg Botanical Gardens.

In an increasingly popular post-wedding trend, brides will wade into the ocean, get knee deep in cow dung or sit in grasslands full of bindies for that perfect picture.

The shoots are called “trashing the dress”, and Bundaberg region photographers are noticing more brides than ever before are willing to go all out for a photograph that will last an eternity — even if the dress does not.

Bundaberg photographer Rhondda Scott said an increasing number of her brides were seeing the “trash the dress” theme in wedding magazines and wanted to try it themselves.

“It’s about creating an art piece,” she said.

“It’s an experience for the bride, as well as the groom.

“Before the wedding it’s all about keeping the dress clean.”

During one of Ms Scotts’ shoots, the groom and their baby daughter came to watch the bride get frocked up before going for a swim in Smiths Crossing, near Bucca.

And the photographer said the dress-trashing was not only for newlyweds.

“Girls who’ve been jilted by their man do it too — it’s a freedom thing,” Ms Scott said.

Fellow photographer Paul Beutel said he had also received an increasing amount of requests throughout the year from brides to do something different in their dresses after the big day.

“It gives us more creative freedom,” he said.

Mr Beutel has photographed a bride who waded waist-deep into the ocean, before lying in wet sand and letting waves crash over her.

And one of his more daring brides scaled a five-metre high fence on a cattle yard for her trash the dress photograph.

Another of the region’s photographers, Susan Wall, said she dressed a model up in her own wedding dress about a year ago before taking her own trash the dress photographs.

She said she wanted to show potential clients how a different location or taking a few risks could enhance the final photograph.

She agreed with the other photographers that the unique photo shoots allowed her to create artistic pieces.

“You’re not limited to the time of day, in between the ceremony and reception, and the brides are not concerned about getting dirty or messing up their hair,” Mrs Wall said.

The photographer said that a couple of years ago maternity photographs — where women pose with their burgeoning bellies — were rare, but now they were comparatively popular.

She said she expected dress-trashing photographs to gain popularity in the same way.

“When it’s just the couple it can bring more intimacy into the photographs too, because there is not a group of people watching them,” Mrs Wall said.

And Ms Scott said drycleaning the dress was part of her price package.

“Even if the dress is wrecked, some brides want to put it back in the box and keep it,” she said.



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