Blake Harris and Thomas Woodland play Laser Skirmish at the Family Fun Day held at Moore Park Beach Tavern to help raise funds for the Deakin family.
Blake Harris and Thomas Woodland play Laser Skirmish at the Family Fun Day held at Moore Park Beach Tavern to help raise funds for the Deakin family. Max Fleet

New laws take fun out of tag

BLAKE Harris and Thomas Woodland face a long time between laser tag games if new imitation weapon laws proposed by the Queensland government come into effect.

The proposed laws mean that Wide Bay Laser Skirmish will be required to licence all of its laser guns as they are classed as imitation weapons.

An age restriction will also be placed on the game with no child under 12 being able to take part and some of the larger guns will be given an 18 and over classification.

“Quite a bit of our business is under 12,” Wide Bay Laser Skirmish owner Rhonda Kay said.

“A lot start about 10 but we've done birthday parties for seven- and nine-year-olds. It's something different for young boys to do.”

Mrs Kay said they did not understand how people could mistake their laser guns for the real thing.

“We would like to sit down with the minister and have a look at what our guns do compared to the real thing,” she said.

The state government last week opened the proposed gun laws up for public comment.

“It is important that these changes are shaped not only by government and industry, but also by the Queenslanders they will directly affect,” police minister Neil Roberts said. “I encourage members of the public to take the opportunity to respond to the proposals for legislative amendment presented in the discussion draft.”



Buccaneers-Souths United clash washed out

Buccaneers-Souths United clash washed out

Officials announced the decision early Friday.

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