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Mum sent to jail for dealing meth

A BUNDABERG mum-of-six, who became pregnant after being charged with trafficking methamphetamine, will spend six months behind bars.

In the Bundaberg Supreme Court today Jasmin Emille Biggs, 37, was sentenced to a head sentence of three years jail after pleading guilty to dealing the drug between December 2014 and January 2015.

Biggs was arrested as a result of her association with Joshua Edward Burden, 28, who was the primary target of a police operation.

Burden was sentenced to a head sentence of four years jail after he pleaded guilty to a string of drug charges, including trafficking, in March last year.

Today Crown prosecutor Greg Cummins said the pair exchanged between 50-60 text messages a day, which showed Biggs was a street level dealer selling methamphetamine for Burden.

He said the trafficking showed some sophistication, with Biggs using codes and drumming up potential customers.

"On one particular day she sent out 18 text messages advertising methamphethamine for sale," he said.

Yesterday defence barrister Callan Cassidy said his client had led a troubled life, which included two volatile relationships.

He said Biggs had no contact with her four children from her first marriage and a 23-month-old and eight-month-old from her most recent relationship.

Mr Cassidy submitted his client was merely a "runner" who Burden, who exploited her low intelligence.

In determining the sentence, Justice McMeekin said the difficult set of circumstances had to take into consideration Biggs' troubled background, which was a sad tale.

But he said Biggs had become pregnant knowing she would have to face the consequences after being arrested.

"If I'm disturbing a family it's because she brought a child into the world when most women would have been very careful," he said.

Biggs will be released on parole in September.

Topics:  buncourt drug trafficking methampetamine supreme court



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