PIONEER: Brian 'Tristy' Trist surfing at Bells Beach in 1964. Left: Nora and Brian back in 2008. Photo: Barrie Sutherland Watermarks Photo Gallery
PIONEER: Brian 'Tristy' Trist surfing at Bells Beach in 1964. Left: Nora and Brian back in 2008. Photo: Barrie Sutherland Watermarks Photo Gallery Barrie Sutherland Watermarks

Mourners to farewell Noosa dad and surfing icon

AUSTRALIAN surfing icon and Noosa visionary Brian Trist will be fondly farewelled after he died peacefully aged 85.

'Tristy', a Noosa Heads icon, died last Wednesday.

His legacy will live large in Australian surfing circles, as he was one of the creators of the first-ever access to Bells Beach.

A prominent property investor, Mr Trist was a Life Patron of the Noosa Tigers Australian Football Club.

Tristy introduced many to the country's most famed break, Bells Beach.

One of the Bells originals, Mr Trist named Winkipop, the lightning fast, hollow, point-style reef break directly next door to Bells.

 

28-12-2008 180137b 2008 Beach Socials enjoying the humid conditions at Pincushion ( just north of Maroochy main Beach ) Cotton Tree. (L-R)Nora and Brian Trist of Noosa Heads Photo: Jason Dougherty/ Sunshine Coast Daily
28-12-2008 180137b 2008 Beach Socials enjoying the humid conditions at Pincushion ( just north of Maroochy main Beach ) Cotton Tree. (L-R)Nora and Brian Trist of Noosa Heads Photo: Jason Dougherty/ Sunshine Coast Daily Jason Dougherty/180137

He was the first to successfully ride a wave on the break, so was given the honour of naming what has become an iconic surf spot.

The Australian National Surfing Museum paid tribute to Tristy, with long-time surfers recalling how he made the first steps down to the beach with wood and supports made from his plumber piping.

In 1967 he won the Senior Surfing Title at the Easter Bells Classic on one of the first short board designs ever ridden in Australia.

"But most of all he shared waves, told great stories around the beach fire and mentored us in surfing and life," the museum's tribute read.

In 1972 Brian and wife Nora moved to Noosa where he set up businesses and started surfing the Noosa National Park points.

He built the Noosa Tigers clubhouse along with mate Len Daddow and others, where he remained a club stalwart.

Former Tigers captain Adam Bovalino said Tristy was an inspiration to many at the club.

"He was always doing something," Mr Bovalino said.

"Tristy treated everyone the same... he was very highly respected."

A teetotaller, Tristy was a prominent member of Frank's Gym.

Mr Trist's son, Adam, spoke on behalf of the family and said his dad's approach to parenting had given them a fantastic grounding in life.

"Our dad has always guided us in the right direction by giving us choices, not by dictating or putting us down and we are truly lucky," Adam said.

"His words of wisdom and non-judgement have changed many lives."

Tristy's funeral will be held at Gregson and Weight Chapel Noosaville, at 2pm Thursday, October 25, with a celebration of his life to follow at the Noosa Tigers clubhouse from 4pm.

He's survived by wife Nora, children Adam, Karen and Katrina, grandchildren and extended family.



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