LONG DISTANCE: Bargara ocean swimmers before taking a plunge on Saturday morning. (L to R): Guy McNicol, Hunter Sproule, Travis Reid, Leslie Sproule, Matthew Eichmann, Jacob Reid, George Martin, Peter Brown and Peter Shaw.
LONG DISTANCE: Bargara ocean swimmers before taking a plunge on Saturday morning. (L to R): Guy McNicol, Hunter Sproule, Travis Reid, Leslie Sproule, Matthew Eichmann, Jacob Reid, George Martin, Peter Brown and Peter Shaw. Contributed

Have you considered ocean swimming?

FOR some people watching the black line in the pool pass under them can be a therapeutic experience while others find it mind-numbingly boring.

And if you fall into the second category, ocean swimming might be for you.

Ocean swimming is one of Australia's more rapidly growing sports and competitive ocean swims are regular events on the sporting calendar around much of Australia's coastline.

Instead of the black line passing under them, the swimmers enjoy seeing some of Bargara's marine life in the cool, clear Pacific Ocean.

Since mid-2014, a group of local friends, Peter Shaw, Peter Brown and George Martin, has been meeting regularly to swim at Bargara and Kellys Beach.

This year the ranks of the Saturday morning swimmers have swollen as masters swimmers and triathletes join in to prepare for open water swimming events.

Martin said the swims were not about competition, but the sharing of an interest in open-water swimming.

"We meet to swim, enjoy good company and follow up with a surf club coffee," Martin said.

Martin says everyone is welcome.

Swimmers who take the plunge regularly range from young triathletes to seniors, and from competition swimmers to those who simply enjoyed taking to the waters.

If you would like to know more about this group, or receive its regular Friday email, which details Bargara swimming prospects for Saturday, contact Martin at

geomartin55@gmail.com.



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