Bloodsucking mozzies have been targeted in Moore Park Beach.
Bloodsucking mozzies have been targeted in Moore Park Beach.

Moore Park mozzies hit for six with control program

THEY'RE the bloodsucking pests that make themselves known at outdoor gatherings across the nation.

While reaching for a can of mozzie spray is as Aussie as a backyard cricket match, when mozzie numbers get out of control, more drastic action is needed.

That was the case this week when Bundaberg Regional Council stepped in to combat a significant outbreak at Moore Park Beach.

According to the council, mozzies had been very active in the coastal township and a control program began early yesterday morning.

Areas around the lagoon, bushland near the state school and the large firebreak at Royal Boulevard were included in control measures.

"Around 75 per cent of the complaints originate from residents around the lagoon and this area will be treated,” divisional councillor Jason Bartels said.

According to the Local Government Association of Queensland, mosquito eggs laid on damp surfaces are usually drought resistant.

"The eggs remain viable and dormant until the pool, container or cavity is filled by rain water, irrigation or tidal water,” the mosquito management code of practice says.

"This explains why there are outbreaks of mosquitoes within a week or two of rain after a long dry spell.”

To prevent mozzie numbers, residents are urged clean up anywhere water can pool, such as kids toys, tyres and buckets.



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