IN CUSTODY: Callum James Dunlop, 32, appeared before Magistrate Belinda Merrin via videolink, having already served 54 days in pre-sentence custody.
IN CUSTODY: Callum James Dunlop, 32, appeared before Magistrate Belinda Merrin via videolink, having already served 54 days in pre-sentence custody. Zach Hogg BUN110814CRT3

'I'm good at fighting, smashing people': Tomahawk man jailed

A MAN who chased down a car with a tomahawk was intoxicated, high on marijuana and off his meds, a court has heard.

Callum James Dunlop, 32, pleaded guilty to one count of going armed so as to cause fear and one count of unlawful possession of a weapon in the Bundaberg Magistrates Court yesterday.

He appeared before Magistrate Belinda Merrin via videolink, having already served 54 days in pre-sentence custody after being refused bail on August 13.

The day before, a car was travelling along Barolin St, Bundaberg, about 6.20pm when a man holding a tomahawk ran on to the road.

The driver slowed down immediately before coming to a full stop.

As Dunlop walked toward the vehicle carrying a man and a woman, he started waving the axe "in a threatening manner".

Police prosecutor Senior Constable Andrew Blunt said the victim quickly reversed his car in an attempt to escape, before Dunlop ran from the roadway and back to a nearby home.

A short time later police found Dunlop at a unit.

After admitting he had a weapon on him, officers found the 45cm-long tomahawk hidden down his pants.

Sen Const Blunt said Dunlop was very clearly under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Police had dealt with Dunlop for similar offending 16 days earlier, when they caught him trespassing on private property.

About 1am on July 28 at Norville, officers found him sitting in a person's front yard.

He admitted to carrying a weapon again - this time a home-made knuckleduster.

Because "he could fight really good and smash people", Dunlop said he had the knuckleduster to protect himself.

Defence lawyer Gavin James said his client had been drunk and high on marijuana for both incidents.

He said Dunlop had suffered a brain injury when he was younger which had affected his cognitive function and claimed his client had had a really bad week at the time of the tomahawk incident.

"When his mental health is not at a good point, he is quick to anger and become aggressive," Mr James said.

He submitted a six-month head sentence with parole release after serving one third would be the most suitable punishment.

"It may assist him with his mental health and get him back on his medication," he told Ms Merrin.

He was sentenced to six months with a parole release date on October 11.



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