COVER UP: Alan's Mowing owner Alan Bentham says people should remember to use nets to tie down loads on trailers and utes. Not only is it the law, it can save lives. Photo: Max Fleet / NewsMail
COVER UP: Alan's Mowing owner Alan Bentham says people should remember to use nets to tie down loads on trailers and utes. Not only is it the law, it can save lives. Photo: Max Fleet / NewsMail Max Fleet

Law covers nets over loads

IT IS law that you must cover your utility or trailer load with a net, Bundaberg police warn.

The clarification comes as speculation over laws runs rife in the community with the popularity of nets to secure loads increasing.

A Bargara police spokesman yesterday said the growth was for good reason, with a new law introduced last year.

The offence is failing to secure a load on a private light vehicle, complies with requirements.

"What you need to do is to put a net across it (the load) to ensure nothing can come out," the spokesman said.

He said the law covered large items like mowers and smaller items including tools.

"If you've got small items, then you need a smaller-gapped net."

Failure to comply attracts a $227 fine but no loss of demerit points.

But the change won't mean much for Alan's Mowing owner Alan Brenham, who said he was a user of nets and tie downs to protect his property and himself.

"It stops things from falling off and I'd be responsible if anything did fall," Mr Brenham said.

He said he used nets when transporting loose items like grass clippings.

Jenny Breen of Breenies Mowing Services also owns a net and said it cost her quite a bit of money but was rarely used by her business anymore.

"We bought a net a few years ago for $120, like a bloody fisher net, when it was all a big thing but now we're wondering if it was just hearsay," she said.

Ms Breen said she sometimes used the net for green waste but had shifted away from using it at all.

"With nets, it was the whole thing of tying it up," she said.

"Then everything gets tangled up into the net and you pull it and pull it.

"But we've heard that someone's been fined for it."

Ms Breen said she had heard of someone who had their toolbox fall off a ute being fined separately for each tool.

"We'd certainly like to know if it's really a law or not," she said.

While the law comes under Queensland Police, it is not a Department of Transport and Main Roads (DTMR) requirement.

"Queensland's legislation requires safe restraint of all loads in or on a vehicle," a DTMR spokesman said.

"However, we don't have any specific requirements as to the particular method.

"While we don't mandate the use of cargo nets on any type of vehicle, they are an effective method to restrain loads in certain circumstances."



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