Key advisers say Qld’s COVID recovery plan lacks vision

 

 

QUEENSLAND'S economic recovery plan has been panned as neither visionary nor detailed enough to help the tens of thousands of businesses struggling to keep their head above water.

Despite working as key advisers to the Palaszczuk Government on its COVID recovery plan, the CCIQ says what's been released is nothing more than "a rehash of announcements", leaving Queensland "meandering through COVID without any real plan".

The broadside came as Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk campaigned in Cairns on a three-day Community Cabinet visit where she announced $52.9 million to start building a Cairns University Hospital and defended her economic plan as "the most comprehensive" in the country.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced $52.9 million in funding for the Cairns Hospital, which includes $1.5 for a business study into a tertiary training partnership with James Cook University. Picture: Brendan Radke
Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced $52.9 million in funding for the Cairns Hospital, which includes $1.5 for a business study into a tertiary training partnership with James Cook University. Picture: Brendan Radke

A memo to members from CCIQ chief executive Stephen Tait gave the plan the thumbs down as 54 per cent of his members worry they're at risk of permanent closure within 12 months once JobKeeper finishes.

"It was neither visionary nor detailed; more a rehash of announcements," Mr Tait wrote.

CCIQ general manager of policy and advocacy Amanda Rohan said business confidence was low and economic conditions poor even before COVID hit.

"To have been in for two terms, you'd expect they'd have more meat on the bones about where they want to take the economy," Ms Rohan said.

"There's a lack of transparency and leadership at the moment on getting that detail out and letting us be able to decide how we can get businesses moving and get Queensland on its feet."

CCIQ chief executive Stephen Tait, federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and CCIQ general manager of policy and advocacy Amanda Rohan.
CCIQ chief executive Stephen Tait, federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and CCIQ general manager of policy and advocacy Amanda Rohan.

She said the plan contained points such as "backing small business", "regulatory reform" and committing to a 25 per cent procurement target to "buy local", but there was no detail or monetary commitments on how that would be achieved despite concrete suggestions being made during consultation.

"Heading into an election, it's a great time to put your best plan forward to show business and the broader community how we're going to get out of this," Ms Rohan said.

"They did manage good consultations, but it hasn't gone anywhere by the sounds," she said.

Ms Palaszczuk said she rejected the CCIQ's assessment.

"It's the most comprehensive plan that any Premier has released," she said.

"CCIQ is part of our alliance, we're all working together on our strong plan for economic recovery and they have been working with us and if they have any other ideas to put forward to the alliance I'm more than happy to discuss it with them."

Originally published as Key advisers say Qld's COVID recovery plan lacks vision



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