SAD END: Kangaroos are being hit by cars in suburban areas, including a male grey kangaroo on Elliott Heads Rd, outside Woongarra State School.
SAD END: Kangaroos are being hit by cars in suburban areas, including a male grey kangaroo on Elliott Heads Rd, outside Woongarra State School. Emma Reid

Motorists asked to watch for wildlife

MOTORISTS are being warned to watch out for wildlife between now and Christmas with kangaroos and wallabies more likely to be found near roadsides.

Over recent weeks a Bundaberg resident said she saw a number of dead kangaroos in built-up areas around Kepnock and Woongarra.

Wildlife carer Dave Derrett said it was likely the animals had sought food along the road edge.

"We see the animals gather on the edge of the road looking for the green feed which grows there from the run off from the road," Mr Derritt said.

"This happens a lot during Spring as the dry season comes to an end.

"People need to be on the look out especially around dusk and dawn as the animals are on the move to find feed or head home after feeding at this time."

Wildlife carer Judy Elliot said drought could be a cause in attracting native animals into suburban areas.

"I've had a lot of wallabies lately and the drought can play a part in this," Ms Elliot said.

"Open areas of grass bring them in close to town as well and with humans building into their territory.

"We just ask people to slow down when they know the animals are around."

A Department of Environment and Heritage Protection spokesperson said kangaroos can be found in suburban areas for a number of reasons.

"As urban development expands into wildlife habitat, people living on the fringes of this expansion will come into contact with native wildlife," they said.

"During times of drought, kangaroos and other native animals can enter urban areas seeking food and water. And kangaroos can adapt to urban environments if they provide shelter and water and grass to eat."

Bundaberg Regional Council Health and Regulatory Services spokesman Wayne Honor said up to a dozen requests per week were made to remove deceased animals.

"Public safety and especially the safety of the motoring public is a prime concern for (the) council and staff respond as quickly as possible to remove dead animals," Cr Honor said.

There is obviously also an element of sensitivity involved as no one like to see animals left in public view if it can be avoided."

Cr Honor said while all animals, when circumstances allowed, were collected as quickly as possible in urban areas, animals killed on roads in rural areas of the region may only be moved out of sight of the roadway if the location permits.

Reports concerning dead animals or a request to remove them can be made by contacting the Bundaberg Regional Council on 1300 883 699.



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