An scanned image of the original Yellowhead on the South Alligator River in 1995 Picture: CLINT JEBBINK
An scanned image of the original Yellowhead on the South Alligator River in 1995 Picture: CLINT JEBBINK

Is this 5m yellow croc the son of a killer?

THE suspected son of the notorious "Yellowhead" crocodile has been spotted in South Alligator River.

The 5m "killer croc" had a unique light-coloured head and was known to terrorise fishos along the same river way in the 80s and 90s.

Top End fisherman Alex Julius said he disappeared in the late 90s and was believed to have resurfaced at Adelaide River in 2012, where he came to be known as Michael Jackson by the locals.

The croc was then put down after he killed a man in 2014.

"Old Yellowhead was a vicious, clever croc who was always tailing boats and stealing their fish," Mr Julius said.

"He was a problem croc even back in the 80s. There was a film crew out at South Alligator River once that tipped their dingy over.

"Yellowhead raced over and latched onto a life jacket while they made their escape.

"I can't think of a croc who ever acted as aggressively as he did."

Mr Julius said he believes he spotted Yellowhead's offspring at the top end of South Alligator River on Saturday.

"He's 3m long, the same colour as old Yellowhead and about 20 years old so the dates match up for when he was there last," he said.

"The moment I saw him I thought this has got to be Yellowhead junior.

"He's just as brazenly aggressive. You only need to see that evil glint in his eye to know he's his son."

Jackie Gray from Spectacular Jumping Crocodiles used to see Michael Jackson all the time during their tours on the Adelaide River and agrees the young croc could "definitely be his son".

"I wouldn't rule it out," Ms Gray said.

"Because we don't know for sure if his colour was passed down genetically or through a defect at birth.

"Crocodiles eggs need to be at 31.8 degrees at birth and anything different from that can bring up birth defects, so his colour could be because of that.

"Even if he's not his son, it's incredible that his still alive because only one per cent of croc babies make it and he can't even camouflage himself.

"You can see him a mile away - he's one in a million."



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