Noelene Fogelis presents the Mayor of Ipswich, Paul Pisasale, with a bottle of Bundaberg Rum at the Urban Development Institute of Australia lunch.
Noelene Fogelis presents the Mayor of Ipswich, Paul Pisasale, with a bottle of Bundaberg Rum at the Urban Development Institute of Australia lunch.

Mayor says to focus on positives

BUNDABERG needs to start believing in itself, according to one of the highest-profile mayors in Queensland.

Ipswich Mayor Paul Pisasale was in Bundaberg yesterday to attend a lunch meeting of the city’s branch of the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA).

His message to the members was they had to start opening up Bundaberg to the rest of Australia and the rest of the world.

“What people have to do is talk about the positives, talk about how great it really is,” he said.

Cr Pisasale, who has been credited with turning around the fortunes of Ipswich since he became mayor in 2004, told the members they had to start forgetting about the past and concentrate on the future.

“This is a great area when you look at what you’ve got here,” he said.

“You’ve got more resources here than Ipswich has, but are you using them effectively?”

Mr Pisasale said the business people of Bundaberg had to start getting out a strong message of the good things that were happening in the city.

“When I got here the first person I met told me three bad things about Bundaberg,” he said.

“I said ‘I didn’t know that, why not tell me about three good things’.”

Cr Pisasale said the key to improving Bundaberg’s position was a partnership between business and the local authorities.

“In Ipswich we had some issues and we worked at fixing them,” he said.

“Now people who don’t even like me vote for me.

“Respect is more important.”

Cr Pisasale said it was important that people across the community came up with positive ideas for improving life in Bundaberg.

“I’ve become an ambassador for Bundaberg,” he said.

UDIA acting branch president David Newby said after Cr Pisasale’s talk that it was obvious everybody at all levels through government and the private sector had to collaborate for the good of the region.

“Bundaberg has a problem with reverse parochialism, where we think we’re not good enough to do big things,” he said.



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