CARBON PROJECT: Dr Kerry Blackman and Laura Sutton with the Gidarjil Land and Sea Ranger team. Together they have registered a carbon farming project under the Australian Government's Emissions Reduction Fund.
CARBON PROJECT: Dr Kerry Blackman and Laura Sutton with the Gidarjil Land and Sea Ranger team. Together they have registered a carbon farming project under the Australian Government's Emissions Reduction Fund. Contributed

Indigenous land practice to reduce greenhouse emissions

HOW can 60,000 years of land management practice be incorporated into the nation's most innovative farming initiative?

The answer lies in a first-of-its kind collaboration between a local indigenous organisation, Australia's largest environmental markets developer and the peak body for natural resource management in the Burnett Mary Region.

The Gidarjil Development Corporation, with support from the Burnett Mary Regional Group, has partnered with GreenCollar to register a carbon farming project under the Federal Government's Emissions Reduction Fund.

The fund supports landholders to generate income through land management practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions or store carbon in soil and vegetation.

The Gidarjil carbon farming project will use traditional mosaic and fire-stick farming practices to control non-native species across three Gidarjil-owned properties.

Fire-stick farming is an indigenous land management practice that uses fire to burn vegetation, facilitating hunting and optimising the composition of plant and animal species in an area.

Gidarjil Development Corporation managing director Kerry Blackman is excited about the project's many benefits, including the engagement of the Gidarjil ranger team.

"This project is a fantastic opportunity to share knowledge and pass on traditional land management methods,” Dr Blackman said.

"It is important for our rangers to appreciate our land's unique values and develop culturally appropriate management skills.”

GreenCollar's Laura Sutton said they were facilitating a range of on-ground training for the ranger team.

"The team will be exposed to a suite of survey and monitoring methods that will assist in skills development and capacity building for the Gidarjil rangers involved,” she said.

"Moreover, this project demonstrates the social, cultural, environmental and economic benefits that can be delivered through environmental markets like carbon.”

Gidarjil's facilities at Thornhill Station will be used as a hub to raise awareness of the project.



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