PLAGUE: Bundaberg Regional Council has confirmed it has received an increased number of resident requests relating to mosquitoes recently.
PLAGUE: Bundaberg Regional Council has confirmed it has received an increased number of resident requests relating to mosquitoes recently. Henrik_L

'Huge winged vampires' invading Bundy's skies

A PLAGUE of airborne mosquitos has invaded Bundaberg with residents shocked at the size and ferocity of the winged vampires.

Across social media, people living in Moore Park, Thabeban, Pine Creek, Biggenden, Lake Ellen, Bargara and other suburbs are complaining about the flying bloodsuckers as they seek their next hapless victim.

Residents are terrified amid reports some of the mosquitos are as large as a 20-cent coin.

Cathy O'Brien took to the NewsMail's Facebook page pleading with Bundaberg Regional Council to take more aggressive action against the mozzies.

"Bundaberg Regional Council is trialling a slow release remedy, however I think they fail to realise how many there are," she wrote.

A photo shared by Bundaberg man John Solito.
A photo shared by Bundaberg man John Solito.

"You literally cannot stay outside for very long due to the abundance of these huge winged vampires."

Council health and regulatory services spokesman Peter Heuser said due to warm weather conditions and recent showers, breeding opportunities have increased and recent windy conditions have brought mosquitoes from other areas.

He said council had received an increased number of resident requests relating to mosquitoes recently.

"Council carries out monitoring and control in known hotspots throughout the region each year, generally from October onwards," Cr Heuser said.

"Recent favourable weather conditions for mosquito breeding has required council to undertake these control measures slightly earlier than usual, with control measures carried out in some areas last week," he said.

In August, council approved a mosquito inspection program for the Childers area following the recent discovery of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in the area.

The Aedes aegypti mosquito is able to transmit a number of viruses including dengue fever, chikungunya and the Zika virus from one infected person to another.

Cr Heuser reassured the community that there had been no reported cases of any of these viruses in the region.

CLIPPING THEIR WINGS

Under public health regulations, householders have a responsibility to prevent mosquitoes breeding on their property. You can do this by:

  • Cleaning up items that can hold water or emptying out containers in and around your house and yard weekly can help stop the breeding of mosquitoes. Mosquitoes breed in water-filled containers or objects such as buckets, pot plant bases, palm fronds, bird baths and old tyres.
  • Replacing missing or broken rainwater tank screens and regularly cleaning gutters.
  • Getting your house and yard sprayed by a licenced pest control technician.


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