Brittany Price and Sam Clark with (behind) Artur Kurnikov and Kayla-Rose Wittleton.
Brittany Price and Sam Clark with (behind) Artur Kurnikov and Kayla-Rose Wittleton.

Heart-throb visits schools

NEIGHBOURS star Sam Clark had more than a few hearts racing when he visited Bundaberg high schools yesterday.

The man better known on Ramsay Street as Ringo Brown received a flood of phone numbers from his adoring legions of female fans.

Despite the rock star reception, Mr Clark had an important message to spread.

He visited Bundaberg and Kepnock state high schools to discuss the importance of donating blood.

Following his involvement with the Australian Red Cross Blood Service he has started to make his way along the east coast to visit 50 high schools.

“Giving blood is really important,” he said.

“It’s something that one in three people are going to need in their lifetime.”

But Mr Clark said only one in 30 people donated blood.

“It seems just figures but if it’s someone in your family it’s pretty bad to think about it that way,” he said.

“Hopefully we’ll make up that deficit so in generations to come it won’t even be an issue.”

Mr Clark has never needed the gift of blood but the amount of people who did, he said, was staggering.

“One-third of cancer patients need blood,” he said.

“There will be a lot of people who will know someone with cancer.

“It really does affect all of us.”

Kepnock librarian Liz Humphreys said the school had been giving to the blood service for the past 12 years.

“Every Wednesday morning we drive over with whoever is available to donate blood,” she said.

She said parents had to sign a permission form for the students to be involved.

Ms Humphreys said she gave out 50 forms on the day for parents to sign.

“We average over 100 donations a year but this will drive that up,” she said.

Kepnock student Brittany Price said Mr Clark gave her the inspiration to look into blood donation.

“I never really knew much about it,” she said.

“It’s a great cause to help people out.”



Former paramedic helping late-night revellers in Bundy

Former paramedic helping late-night revellers in Bundy

Former paramedic loves helping out revellers in the CBD

Aged care facilities need to rectify shortcomings

Aged care facilities need to rectify shortcomings

"It's why we have the audit process in place,” Pitt says

Aged care provider advocates say staff quotas not the answer

Aged care provider advocates say staff quotas not the answer

But union says some nurses are looking after 200 people alone

Local Partners