Avenell Heights residents became concerned when they continually spotted the skeletal stray wandering the streets.

Some would leave food and water for the dog and others tried to entice the dog with their own pets but their efforts were in vain.

One concerned community member created a Facebook group called "Jay Jay Bundaberg's stray" where the growing number of searchers would post photo sightings of the dog.

Marissa Pirovano was one of more than 100 people who joined the Facebook group and search.

"I started doing morning and afternoon trips after I'd taken my son to school and when I was picking him up from school," she said.

"I'd just do a couple of laps around and see if I could find him."

Mrs Pirovano said Sharyn Banks from Red Collar Rescue then let the group know the dog had been collected by the pound and called for someone to take him in.

"We were all concerned that if he went to the pound he was going to be put down," Mrs Pirovano said.

Mrs Pirovano quickly made the decision to foster the dog and headed to the pound.

Expecting a flighty dog who wouldn't sit in the car, Mrs Pirovano was shocked when Jay Jay jumped in her car and laid down ready for the ride "home".

She said it didn't take long for Jay Jay to be part of the family, sleeping that night on the end of her daughter's bed and performing tricks on cue for her husband.

Mrs Pirovano said that she would love to keep the dog but, with two dogs already at living her house, she was unsure the Bundaberg Regional Council would give her approval.



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